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The Wayfair Decision: How Michigan Policymakers Should Respond

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in South Dakota v. Wayfair last June overturned decades of precedent governing which businesses states could subject to collection and remittance requirements for sales taxes. This report offers guidance on how Michigan should modify its tax laws to implement these new taxation standards. It raises important questions that lawmakers should consider before subjecting new businesses and entrepreneurs to new tax collection requirements.

Workforce Development in Michigan

This report provides a survey of existing workforce development efforts in Michigan, both public and private. It includes a review of career and technical education provided by K-12 school districts, occupational training programs provided through community colleges, as well as job training offered by for-profit entities, unions, industry associations and private, nonprofit organizations. After reviewing these current programs, the report offers general skepticism about the ability of the state to provide the type of workforce development that many politicians claim is needed.

Multilateral Disarmament: A State Compact to End Corporate Welfare

This study provides a plan for how states can end the harmful competition that the practice of corporate welfare encourages. It describes why corporate welfare is damaging to local and state economies and a zero-sum game from a national perspective. It also ranks the states based on how many handouts they make to favored businesses.

In addition, it offers an entirely new strategy to end policies that economists agree are wasteful. By entering into a state compact, as they are authorized to do under the U.S. Constitution, states could agree not to offer preferential tax treatment or other subsidies in an attempt to lure businesses into their borders. Instead, states will compete as they were designed to under the U.S. Constitution, based on regulatory burdens, business culture and broad-based tax policy.

Ending the Skimming of Union Dues from Federal Child Care Funds

This report, jointly published by the Freedom Foundation and the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, outlines how the federal government can put an end to the inappropriate use of funding for two federal programs: the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Child Care and Development Fund. Despite Supreme Court rulings against the practice, several states still allow unions to siphon off dues payments from these funds intended to support home care and child care services for low-income families and the disabled.

A Primer on Michigan's Criminal Justice System

This report describes the basics of how Michigan’s criminal justice system works: explaining some essential features of criminal law, the various layers of law enforcement, adjudication processes, prison policy and more. Unlike most policy papers, however, this report is meant to be strictly descriptive. That is, it does not attempt to judge the effectiveness of Michigan’s current criminal justice system or provide policy recommendations. It is hoped that the information contained here will contribute to more informed debate about how to best improve Michigan’s criminal justice system.

Questions for Appropriators

This questionnaire was developed to guide lawmakers as they scrutinize agency budget requests. In both good times and bad, the sum of these requests will always exceed available revenues. Government agencies’ and program budgets should never operate on auto-pilot. By following this template and obtaining basic information about each program’s origin, purpose, performance, legal authority, funding history and federal connections, policymakers can then hone in on specific changes to consider for the programs — including funding or staffing levels, performance measures and legislative reforms.

The conversation this information will spark can help forge agreement about how to efficiently and effectively meet the needs of Michigan residents and how to use the final state budget to best serve the needs of the public. Careful consideration of spending priorities such as this can boost public confidence in state government and elected officials.

From Prohibited to Permitted: A Legal History of Corporate Handouts in Michigan

Elected officials today regularly try to woo large companies into locating to their state or city by offering them special tax treatment or subsidizing them in some way. States and cities compete with each other in this regard — Michigan is no exception — and this competition makes national headlines when well-known companies choose to relocate or expand. With this in mind, one might reasonably assume that publicly funded economic development is a long-standing, firmly established practice. But that’s not the case in Michigan.

This report chronicles the history of Michigan Supreme Court decisions on this issue. It is not a formal legal review of the case law, but rather a historical account of the most important cases, spanning from Michigan’s earliest days as a new state to the ratification of the current constitution in 1963. The narrative that unfolds will surprise those not familiar with Michigan’s unique experience with taxpayer-funded corporate handouts.