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Results 1 to 50 for the year 1995
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  1. The Price We Pay for Government Work
    If state employees are underpaid, it is not because they are paid less than private-sector workers. The documented wage and benefit gap between Michigan's private and public sector is significant and growing.
     
  2. Should Bargains Be Illegal?
    When a customer is sued by a former supplier because the customer found a better bargain with another company, whose side does the law tend to support? A Michigan firm finds itself in this situation.
     
  3. A Visit to the Capuchin Soup Kitchen
    If welfare as a government entitlement ends, private institutions will play a larger role in helping needy people. Detroit's Capuchin Soup Kitchen is an excellent example of meeting needs through private, voluntary cooperation.
     
  4. Markets Provide Clear Signals for Telecommunications
    When firms compete, costs tend to go down and product quality tends to rise. When regulators enter the marketplace, operating under a different set of incentives, price and quality trends tend to work against the consumer.
     
  5. Welfare Pays Better than Work
    Some Michigan welfare recipients make the only logical economic choice when they stay on welfare rather than find work that pays even $9 per hour.
     
  6. Does the Constitution Still Apply in Kalamazoo?
    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects our homes against unreasonable searches. A Kalamazoo city rental inspection ordinance runs afoul of this provision, and helps create an unusual alliance.
     
  7. The Children Are More Important than the System
    An initiative to provide Michigan public school students and parents greater choice in school selection would benefit students and schools. Opponents of school choice defend the existing system and status quo, and find themselves opposing freedom instead of helping to make it work.
     
  8. Ending the Lawyer Monopoly
    A Michigan statute that protects lawyers from competition contributes to sky-high attorney fees that burden the average consumer and prevents many poor people from affording simple legal services.
     
  9. Teachers as Entrepreneurs in the Classroom
    American education is still burdened by the thing that caused the economies of Eastern Europe to disintegrate-central planning that all but obliterates individual initiative and accountability. Private-practice teaching is an innovation that gives teachers more freedom and incentive; provides administrators more flexibility and cost savings; and allows more choice and improved education to students.
     
  10. Why I Joined the Mackinac Center
     
  11. Stress Claims in Michigan: Worker's Compensation Entitlement for Mental Disability
    The worker's compensation system was developed as a way for workers who suffer on-the-job physical injuries to be compensated fairly and quickly for medical expenses and loss of income. In recent years, however, it has expanded into a new area fraught with vagueness: mental stress. Though the focus of this report is on Michigan, which has been in the forefront among states in mental stress claims, its searching analysis of the inherent difficulty in evaluating these claims will be useful for anyone interested in this growing area of workplace abuse. 36 pages.
     
  12. Over 100 Midwest Economists Call for End to Economic War Between the States
     
  13. A New Approach to Financing Highways
    Michigan highway financing goes through "binge" and "bust" cycles that allow roads to deteriorate before new monies are raised. Modern technology may make possible a more equitable and cost-effective "pay-as-you-go" system.
     
  14. The Role of Prevention in Health Care Reform
    Most Medicare, Medicaid, and other health care reform plans seek to manipulate health care need. Another proposal, medical savings accounts, would encourage injury and illness prevention and would help save Americans $200 billion annually.
     
  15. Competitive Contracting Is the Taxpayer's Best Friend
    When government construction projects do not even accept bids from nonunion firms, the taxpayers pay more and nonunion workers are denied employment opportunities.
     
  16. Outcome-Based Education: Miracle Cure or Plague?
    This report explains why there is so much conflict over outcome-based education (OBE). When states began to institute OBE programs, they turned the crucial task of defining outcomes over to the very education establishment threatened by the process. Having adopted in principle the laudable focus on education results, the educrats then went on to propose a list of outcomes that emphasizes not academic achievement but rather, attitudes and behavior that often reflect quasi-political or ideologically correct positions. 24 pages.
     
  17. Putting Together the Privatization Puzzle
     
  18. School Reform: Lessons From Michigan
     
  19. Lessons from Outrageous Laws
    The laws uncovered by the Mackinac Center's Outrageous Law Competition will make you chuckle. Underlying them are two serious lessons which teach us about government's response to crises and the role of special interests.
     
  20. Enviromania in the Textbooks
    Environmental problems exist, but some Michigan textbooks make exaggerated claims and teach children that the world is near destruction. Twisting facts is bad enough, but it may be worse to subject our children to unfounded fears and pressure to save the planet.
     
  21. New Tool to Navigate Web of Economic and Policy Information
     
  22. Teacher, Inc.: A Private Option for Educators
    This study profiles the experiences of a number of educators in private practice, and discusses the benefits that teachers, students, and schools may realize by contracting for instruction. Also included are the results from two national surveys about the legal authority of school boards to contract for instruction, and a chart to help administrators identify the fully allocated costs of in-house and contract service. 23 pages.
     
  23. More to Do on Workers' Compensation Reform
    Michigan is winning the battle to control its workers' compensation costs. It is time to celebrate that success, and take the next steps for improvement. Progress can still be made in getting the injured back to work and screening out dubious claims.
     
  24. Farm Subsidies: The Courage to Say No
    Farm subsidies drive up food prices for the poor and subsidize many millionaire farmers. The problem seems intractable today, but exactly 100 years ago a Michigan man mustered the integrity and courage to deal with this very issue.
     
  25. Lessons from the Mexico Crisis
    About 20 percent of Michigan's goods and services are exported to Mexico. That country's recent currency crisis was met with a U.S.-backed bailout. The federal government could do Michigan a favor by getting its own house in order, and not throwing U.S. taxpayers' money at Mexico's failed policies
     
  26. Who's at Fault for the High Cost of No Fault?
    Michigan's no fault auto insurance is among the most expensive in the country. Allegations of price gouging by insurance companies make headlines while a far more likely culprit is costly state mandates.
     
  27. On the Roads Again
    Michigan's roads are in poor shape and they need money for repairs. Unfortunately, hundreds of millions of Michigan road dollars are diverted to nonroad uses, and are even used to build roads in other states. Cost-saving measures are recommended, along with a call to give roads higher priority without a net tax increase on Michigan citizens. This contains the key points of the Center's comprehensive transportation study, Fixing the Roads.
     
  28. The EPA's Toll on the Mackinac Bridge
    A $50 million unfunded EPA mandate requires that the Mackinac Bridge be repainted inside of a tent. This is a premier example of an unfunded mandate the governor should resist. This piece of research generated enormous statewide attention.
     
  29. Privatization's Historic Advance: Past and Present Efforts
     
  30. Is Your County Losing in Arts Subsidies?
    Most Michigan counties are net losers in the grab for public arts dollars. The claim that government spending on art produces a special "multiplier" effect is spurious. The bottom line: Art is too important to be dependent on government.
     
  31. Stadium Subsidies Strike Out
    Government subsidies for a new Tiger Stadium amount to corporate welfare. Other big businesses have to raise their own private capital-why not baseball? This article makes the philosophical and economic case for private sports facilities.
     
  32. Block Grants Are Not the Answer
    If you wanted something done in your community, would it ever occur to you to send a check to Washington, D.C., so the federal bureaucracy could take a cut before sending back the rest?
     
  33. A New Day for Michigan Schools
    Two new laws take effect in April 1995 that will help Michigan's 1.7 million school children and their parents. Will schools take advantage of the newly created freedoms and opportunities?
     
  34. The Other Side of Tax Deductions
    Ironically, taxpayers' cherished deductions and loopholes stand in the way of meaningful tax reform. There is a fairer system that would still provide adequate government revenue.
     
  35. Private Efforts in the Public Interest
    A private nonprofit environmental group knows that the free market is the most effective tool for protecting the environment. This is a wonderful success story of voluntary cooperation instead of government coercion.
     
  36. Fixing the Roads: A Blueprint for Michigan Transportation Infrastructure Policy
    This comprehensive study is the only one available that documents Michigan's road needs, illuminates the diversion of hundreds of millions of Michigan road dollars to nonroad and non-Michigan use, demonstrates how Michigan can save over $170 million annually, and shows that a gas tax increase is not needed if funding diversions are stopped and modest savings measures are enacted. Several of its recommendations have been implemented. 40 pages.
     
  37. Washington Should Learn from Michigan's Budget Cuts
    Michigan's turbocharged economy is a result of courageous government streamlining and downsizing. If the federal government is serious about "reinventing," it should follow Michigan's blueprint.
     
  38. The Prison Boom: New Options for Michigan
    The prison business is booming in Michigan-fifteen percent of the General Fund. Can taxpayers afford the bills that mount from business as usual? Michigan can save hundreds of millions of dollars by trying what other states are already doing.
     
  39. MEGA Problems: A New Industrial Policy Bureaucracy
    In a stunning retreat from free-market principles, Governor Engler asks Michigan to join the bandwagon of states in which government picks the industrial winners and losers. The MEGA plan will not work, and may have unintended negative consequences.
     
  40. MEGA Industrial Policy: An Analysis of the Proposed Michigan Economic Growth Authority
    Michigan has seen stellar economic progress due to Governor Engler's free-market reforms. Is MEGA a reversal of the trend? Should government pick the winners and the losers? This report analyzes proposed MEGA legislation. 16 pages.
     
  41. Privatization: On the Right Track
     
  42. The Role of Government in the 21st Century
    What do economics, experience, and political philosophy tell us about government and its proper role in society? In this time of great change in Washington and in the 50 states, Mackinac Center for Public Policy President Lawrence Reed addressed that critical question before a field hearing of the United States Senate Budget Committee. This transcript of his testimony, founded on seven key ideas, is inspirational.
     
  43. The Language of Federal Mandates
    When government forces others to do its bidding without providing the money to pay for it, it is called a mandate. Politicians and bureaucrats try to wriggle out of the responsibility with carefully crafted code phrases. This glossary of "governmentese" will entertain and enlighten.
     
  44. Should You Count on Social Security?
    Why do more Americans believe in UFOs than have faith in Social Security? Can the system be rescued? Other nations have saved their systems with free-market reforms.
     
  45. Catching Speeders: Cops or Cameras
    New technology makes it possible to ticket speeders with cameras, radar, and computers-and no cops. Should it be allowed? There are many pros and cons.
     
  46. Timber Producer Certification in Michigan: Self-Regulation vs. State Regulation
    Which form of regulation is better for solving problems, protecting consumers and the environment and encouraging rational economic planning-regulation by government or regulation by industry through free markets and incentives? Michigan State University Forestry Professor and Mackinac Center Scholar Dr. Potter-Witter argues for a self-certification model that could be applied to other industries. She also provides a thorough review of the Michigan timber market and a timely survey of literature on occupational licensing. 23 pages.
     
  47. Making Michigan Safe for Investors
    Economic progress means enhancing opportunities, promoting capital formation, insisting on fairness in taxation, and keeping good people who create jobs here in Michigan. The onerous intangibles tax works against all these things and should be abolished.
     
  48. Alice in Mandate Land
    Proposed core curriculum from Lansing is more of the same fuzzy thinking that has produced declining achievement scores and increasing functional illiteracy in the schools.
     
  49. Welfare Reform: Have We Gone Far Enough?
    Welfare programs are one of the most unpopular of government activities. Though Michigan has made progress over the past four years, the real challenge lies ahead: making assistance to the needy a private initiative instead of a government responsibility.
     
  50. The Archer Administration: A Commentary at Year One
    After one year of Detroit Mayor Archer's administration, analysts Kleiman and Hutchison conclude that although some promising new directions were taken, much work remains. Experience in other major cities such as Philadelphia point the way for Detroit: Mayor Archer should move quickly to cut tax rates and privatize more services. 10 pages.
     
Results 1 to 50 for the year 1995
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