These reports primarily focus on the most politically revealing votes of the past week, plus the most important votes on matters of policy, so a cumulative list provides a useful reference source, if not a fully comprehensive one. The reports also include some votes that aren’t especially revealing or important, but are just interesting.

To find out who your state senator is and how to contact him or her go here; for state representatives go here.

Note: Due to lengthy House and Senate sessions, some votes from this week will be included in the next Roll Call Report.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 116Make Michigan a "right-to-work" state: Passed 58 to 52 in the House
To prohibit employers from enforcing a union contract provision that compels workers to join or financially support a union as a condition of employment. The bill also includes a $1 million appropriation to make it "referendum-proof." All Democrats voted "no" and all Republicans voted "yes" except for Reps. Forlini, Goike, Horn, McBroom, Somerville and Zorn. This vote sent the bill to the Governor to sign, which he did the same day.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4003Extend "right-to-work" law to government and school employees: Passed 58 to 51 in the House
To prohibit Michigan governments and schools from enforcing a union contract provision that compels employees to join or financially support a union as a condition of employment, except for police and firefighters, who could still be dismissed for failing to pay union dues or fees. This vote sent the bill to the Governor to sign, which he did the same day.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 865Replace repealed "Emergency Manager" law: Passed 63 to 46 in the House 
To replace the Emergency Manager law passed in 2011 and repealed by a statewide referendum with a new law, which will give fiscally-failed cities or school districts a choice of either entering a reform plan consent agreement with the state, entering mediation to create such a plan, being allowed to declare bankruptcy in federal court, or having an emergency manager appointed with powers similar to those that triggered the union-sponsored referendum (to invalidate unaffordable or unsustainable government union contract provisions). The replacement also adds a public information meeting requirement to the process; specifies procedures and conditions for exiting the financial emergency; explicitly gives a school EM authority over academic matters; and contains a modest appropriation that makes it "referendum-proof."

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5711Impose more abortion facility regulations: Passed 27 to 10 in the Senate
To impose more rigorous state regulations on abortion clinics, including expanded licensure and inspection regimes. Also, to require abortion providers to screen women to ensure they are not being intimidated into having an abortion; prohibit "telemedicine" remote doctor exams to prescribe "morning after pill" abortions; establish that the remains of an aborted fetus are subject to the same laws that apply to the disposition of dead bodies of humans who have been born; and more.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 6024Authorize “essential services” tax on industrial plants: Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate 
To give local governments the power to impose targeted property taxes on industrial and commercial property deemed by the bill to be “especially benefited” by fire, police and ambulance services. This would replace some of the revenue from proposed reductions in the property tax imposed on business tools and equipment ("personal property tax").

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

House Bill 4054Make Michigan a "right-to-work" state: Passed 58 to 52 in the House
To prohibit employers from enforcing a union contract provision that compels employees to join or financially support a union as a condition of employment. The bill also includes a $1 million appropriation to make it "referendum-proof." All Democrats voted "no" and all Republicans voted "yes" except for Reps. Forlini, Goike, Horn, McBroom, Somerville and Zorn.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 116Make Michigan a "right-to-work" state: Passed 22 to 16 in the Senate
The Senate vote on the same "right-to-work" measure described above. All Democrats voted "no" and all Republicans voted "yes" except for Sens. Casperson, Green, Nofs and Rocca.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4003Extend "right-to-work" to government and school employees: Passed 22 to 4 in the Senate
To prohibit Michigan governments and schools from enforcing a union contract provision that compels employees to join or financially support a union as a condition of employment.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5463Subsidize new Red Wings Stadium: Passed 27 to 11 in the Senate
To allow property tax revenue "captured" by the Detroit "Downtown Development Authority" to pay the debt on money borrowed to provide taxpayer subsidies for a particular developer's new sports stadium and associated projects (Mike Ilitch). The bill would also exempt DDAs from property and other taxes, and revise details of public officials' appointments to DDA boards.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5688Create Detroit streetlight authority: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate
To authorize a Detroit streetlight authority with the power to borrow money to restore the city's streetlights, 70 percent of which are reportedly out. The bill requires passage of House Bill 5705, which would let Detroit earmark current utility tax revenue to pay off the new debt, and Senate Bill 970, which would suspend a required city income tax reduction until the new debt is paid off. It also allows Detroit's city unions to bargain for the unionization of the authority's employees.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 909Create Detroit regional mass transit authority: Passed 57 to 50 in the House
To create a new Detroit area regional transportation authority covering Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, and potentially others. Among other powers, the authority could levy property taxes (special assessments) and higher local vehicle registration taxes if approved by a majority of voters in the region, meaning a particular community could not “opt out” of the tax increase. The authority would be specifically authorized to create “rolling rapid transit” corridors along some streets and highways, potentially with dedicated lanes that other motorists could not use. It would be run by a board appointed by the counties and the City of Detroit.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 911Authorize Detroit regional transit vehicle registration tax: Passed 57 to 50 in the House
To give the regional transit authority proposed by Senate Bill 909 (above) the power to impose a higher vehicle registration tax in the region to pay for buses and other public transportation. A vote of the people would be required, but if approved region-wide the tax would still be imposed on individual communities that vote against it (no local "opt-out").

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 612Ban abortion coverage from "Obamacare“ exchange: Passed 27 to 11 in the Senate 
To prohibit health insurance acquired (and subsidized) through an “exchange” created under the federal health care law from including coverage for elective abortion.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 6060Give county officials power to halt recall as "non-factual": Passed 65 to 43 in the House 
To require county election commissions to determine whether the reasons for a recall petition are stated both "factually and clearly." Under current law, they must simply determine whether the recall language is clear. Note: This may violate Article 8, Section 8 of Michigan's constitution, which asserts that recallers don't have to justify their reasons, but only make them clear.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5776Require parental permission to place student with "ineffective" teacher: Passed 60 to 49 in the House 
To require a public school district to get the written consent of a parent or guardian before placing a child in a classroom with a teacher who is rated “ineffective” under a new state rating system.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 6024, Authorize “essential services” tax on industrial plants: Passed 57 to 52 in the House
To give local governments the power to impose targeted property taxes on industrial and commercial property deemed by the bill to be “especially benefited” by fire, police and ambulance services. This would replace some of the revenue from proposed reductions in the property tax imposed on business tools and equipment ("personal property tax").

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1293Repeal BCBS tax exemption, regulate like other insurers: Passed 61 to 49 in the House
To convert Blue Cross Blue Shield into a “nonprofit mutual insurance company” (technically "owned" by the policy holders), make it subject to the same regulations as regular health insurers, and no longer exempt BCBS from state and local taxes.

 Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 939Give special treatment to firms submitting to “environmental leader” process: Passed 65 to 43 in the House
To give certain businesses special treatment in awarding state contracts, eligibility for government subsidies, environmental permit and inspection mandates, and more, if the firm submits itself to a government “environmental leader” designation process. This would require a company to demonstrate that it has no outstanding permit violations or serious past ones, adopt certain practices not required by law, submit to certain additional reporting mandates, participate in “workshops,” etc.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1360Extend deadline on school employee pension reform choices: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate 
To extend from October 26, 2012 to January 9, 2013, the deadline for public school employees to choose whether to contribute more toward the cost of their defined benefit pensions or else accept a slightly less generous benefit calculation formula, as required by a recently-passed pension reform law.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 909Create Detroit regional mass transit authority: Passed 24 to 14 in the Senate
To create a new Detroit area regional transportation authority covering Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, and potentially others. Among other powers, the authority could levy property taxes (special assessments) and higher local vehicle registration taxes if approved by a majority of voters in the region, meaning a particular community could not “opt out” of the tax increase. The authority would be specifically authorized to create “rolling rapid transit” corridors along some streets and highways, potentially with dedicated lanes that other motorists could not use. It would be run by a board appointed by the counties and the City of Detroit.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1021Increase state property tax payments to locals: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate
To increase from $2 per acre to $4 per acre the amount the state pays to local governments as “payment in lieu of (property) taxes” (PILT) on state-owned land in their jurisdictions, and index the amount to inflation going forward.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1240Extend lawsuit liability waivers to certain social services agencies: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate
To give social services agencies licensed to oversee child adoptions, foster care and other child care issues immunity from liability for personal injury or property damage caused by the agency's provision of services, except for gross negligence or willful misconduct.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 402Authorize physician impaired driver reports: Passed 56 to 52 in the House
To establish that while a physician has no affirmative obligation to report to the state or a third party any concerns about person's mental and physical qualifications to safely operate a motor vehicle, he or she may do so, and in such a report should recommend a license suspension of six months or more. The bill establishes that the physician has no liability for either making or not making such a report.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5805Exempt “health care sharing ministries” from insurance regulations: Passed 77 to 30 in the House
To establish that “health care sharing ministries” are not subject to state insurance regulations. These are an alternative to insurance, and facilitate voluntary health care cost sharing arrangements among people of similar and sincerely held religious beliefs.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5261Allow more school retiree “double dipping”: Passed 105 to 1 in the House
To allow a former school employee to work as a substitute teacher or coach in the district he or she "retired" from and still collect a pension in addition to the substitute or coaching pay. This would also apply if the "retiree" was employed by private firm under contract to provide substitute teachers.

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5881Allow pension "double-dipping" by some “retired” prison workers: Passed 58 to 48 in the House on November 29, 2012
To allow retired prison employees to simultaneously collect pension benefits and a paycheck for going back to work in a prison, if the person is paid on a per-diem basis for a limited term, with no (additional) benefits, and for less than 1,040 hours annually (the equivalent of 26 40-hour weeks).

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

House Bill 6008blish new “non-ferrous” mine taxation regime: Passed 62 to 45 in the House
To revise the taxation of “non-ferrous” mines (including new copper and other mineral mines in the Upper Peninsula). The bill is part of a package that would exempt these mines from property, income, sales and use taxes, and instead levy a “severance tax” based on the amount of material extracted. Various credits would be allowed against pre-operational start-up costs, including regulatory compliance costs. Most of the tax revenue would go to the local government, but some would go to a new state “rural development fund.”

Who Voted "Yes" And Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 1276Restrict setting aside state land for “biological diversity”: Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate
To prohibit the Department of Natural Resources from designating an area of land specifically for the purpose of achieving “biological diversity.”

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1238Revise state land acquisition procedures: Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate
To revise the procedures and criteria for the acquisition by the state of property paid for with Natural Resources Trust Fund money. Among other things, the bill would impose term limits on members of the NRTC board, require more transparency in its property selection process, and ban sales if the seller was harassed, intimidated, or coerced by the Department of Natural Resources, a local government, or a "qualified" conservation organization. 

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1051Ban school board voting with conflict of interest: Passed 31 to 6 in the Senate 
To prohibit school board members from voting on union and other contracts if a family member has an interest in a contract or works for the school district, including a spouse, child, parent, sibling, nephew or niece, etc. A board member having a child in a district school would not trigger this restriction.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1051Young amendment to Senate Bill 1051: Failed 17 to 20 in the Senate
To extend the school board conflict of interest restrictions proposed by Senate Bill 1051 (above) to include emergency financial managers appointed by the state to manage fiscally failed school districts.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1132Revise adult adoption detail: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate
To allow an individual married person to adopt an adult without the spouse also petitioning for this, or if there is an objection, then with a court's permission. This might be done for purposes of inheritance. The bill makes an exception to the current requirement that both spouses must petition for this.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1335Increase threshold to impose new government workplace safety rules: Passed 25 to 12 in the Senate
To require the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs to not just assert that there is a “clear and convincing need” to impose on employers a new occupational health and safety regulation that exceeds federal standards, but to actually provide a statement of the specific facts used to support the assertion, and show the rule was requested by a broad consensus of employers and employees in an affected industry.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5804Establish statewide indigent criminal defense standards: Passed 71 to 36 in the House
To create a state commission to establish statewide standards and accountability measures for court-appointed attorneys who represent indigent criminal defendants, and a new government office to implement and enforce these statewide. Local governments would be responsible for funding this at current levels (“maintenance of effort”), with the state paying for any additional spending required by new standards, unless the local spending is below minimum levels to be determined by the proposed commission.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

The House did not meet this week. The Senate met for one day.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1293Repeal BCBS tax exemption, regulate like other insurers: Passed 33 to 4 in the Senate 
To convert Blue Cross Blue Shield into a “nonprofit mutual insurance company” (technically "owned" by the policy holders), make it subject to the same regulations as regular health insurers, and no longer exempt BCBS from state and local taxes. The bill requires BCBS to spend $1.5 billion in accumulated reserves over 18 years to augment government health programs.
Note: Under the federal “Affordable Care Act” (“Obamacare”) the “social mission” of being the “insurer of last resort” which was the rationale for this insurer's tax-exempt status no longer applies, since all insurance companies would be subject to similar "guaranteed issue" mandates.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1263Revise state “civilian conservation corps” program: Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate
To authorize conversion of the state “Civilian Conservation Corps” into a nonprofit run by a private entity. Other bills in a package comprised of Senate Bills 1261 to 1265 would cap CCC participation at two years, limit participants' compensation and require the program to persuade colleges and universities to give credit for CCC participation and more.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1279Authorize some electrician licensure exemptions: Passed 25 to 12 in the Senate 
To exclude certain work in manufacturing and mining operations, or at an "independent power producer" facility, from a licensure mandate that prohibits an individual from earning a living as an electrician without a state license (which among other things requires at least four years of apprenticeship in which 8,000 hours of experience must be accumulated).

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1000Ban granting parenting time in certain countries: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate
To prohibit a Michigan court from awarding “parenting time” in child custody disputes which would take place in a country that is not a party to the "Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction," unless both parents give consent. That would include most countries in the Middle East, Asia and Africa.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1141Authorize enhanced parole enforcement: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate
To authorize counties to adopt a “swift and sure” program for the immediate detection and prompt imposition of sanctions for probation violations (including more drug tests), authorize state grants for this, and establish uniform statewide standards and procedures.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1296Create six-year deadline on malpractice lawsuits against lawyers: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate 
To require that malpractice lawsuits against lawyers, law firms or a “legal services” entity be commenced within six years of the lawyer's fault or omission.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visithttp://www.MichiganVotes.org.

More votes from Sept. 25-27. The Legislature will meet just one day this month, on Oct. 17.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 1129Authorize local “pension obligation bond” borrowing: Passed 80 to 28 in the House
To allow local governments to borrow money to cover unfunded employee pension liabilities if the local has closed its traditional “defined benefit” pension system to new employees (who usually are given 401k contributions instead). Unlike other long-term local government borrowing (often called “bonding” or “selling bonds”), no vote of the people would be required.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5557Retroactively exempt Kalamazoo DDA from certain requirements: Passed 93 to 14 in the House
To retroactively create an exception for the Kalamazoo Downtown Development Authority, which failed to comply with certain requirements in the law that allows DDAs to “capture” a portion of taxes levied by local governments, even where the local has exempted a particular corporation from a tax (in other words, the local must pay the DDA some of the revenue it didn't collect). DDAs use the money they "capture" to repay debt they incur for government spending that benefits property owners in a particular area.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1291Regulate “internet-protocol security system” providers: Passed 34 to 1 in the Senate 
To impose government registration, regulation, employee background check and fingerprinting mandates on providers of “internet-protocol enabled premises security, monitoring, and control systems.” These would be defined as security systems that use “an integrated system of IP-enabled devices, sensors, or controls, which may include door and window contacts, access control devices, motion detectors, smoke detectors, moisture detectors, cameras, and software installed at a customer's premises or property.”

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1180Allow “Pure Michigan” theme on license plates: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To allow but not require the Secretary of State to use the "Pure Michigan" brand on standard design license plates.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5284Expand computer crime law to handheld internet gadgets: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate 
To revise the law that authorizes enhanced penalties for using a computer and the internet to communicate for the purpose of committing certain crimes (including stalking, sex crimes and serious violent crimes), so that it also applies to smart phones and other handheld gadgets that access the internet.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

House Bill 5400Appropriate money for fruit grower loan subsidies: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To appropriate $15 million for low-interest loan subsidies for fruit growers who suffered crop damage in 2012 due to an extended March warm spell followed by a hard freeze. Also, to add some spending for lead abatement programs and prison security measures.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1210Expand "brownfield" subsidies: Passed 31 to 7 in the Senate 
To create a state fund to provide "brownfield" subsidies to developers, with money coming from state education tax revenue "captured" by local brownfield tax increment finance authorities. The bill would also authorize these subsidies for certain parking lots and for developers whose projects are deemed to involve a “historic resource."

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5697Establish athlete concussion “time out” criteria: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate 
To require coaches or other adults in charge to remove a student or young athlete from participation in a sports activity due to a suspected concussion until clearance is received from an "appropriate health professional." The bill would also require schools and youth sports associations to distribute specified educational materials about concussions to coaches, young athletes and parents, and require parents and athletes to sign a statement indicating they have read them. The bill would not apply to the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA), which has separate concussion guidelines.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1004Cap cigar tax: Passed 86 to 22 in the House 
To cap the tobacco tax on cigars at 50 cents apiece, and mandate that specialty tobacconists must post a sign warning customers that they must pay all state taxes cigars bought over the internet or through catalogs.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1206Exempt certain sewage compost from sale restrictions: Passed 27 to 11 in the Senate
To waive certain state restrictions on selling or giving away sewage treatment residue for landscaping purposes if it is "mature and stable," has minimal potential to generate a nuisance, is of "exceptional quality” for this purpose, and if the generator of the material has a record of dutiful compliance with state environmental regulations.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5249Expand allowable deer hunting guns south of “rifle line”: Passed 106 to 2 in the House
To expand the types of firearms allowed for deer hunting south of the “rifle line” in the Lower Peninsula. In addition to shotguns and muzzle-loading rifles, hunters could also use .35 caliber or larger repeating pistols, and certain .35 caliber or larger straight-walled rifle cartridges (but not "high-power" rifle rounds that carry for very long distances).

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5696Allow car trade-in “sales tax on the difference” only: Passed 106 to 2 in the House
To exempt from sales tax the value of a trade-in when buying a new motor vehicle or titles watercraft. The buyer would only pay sales tax on the difference between the value of the trade-in and the purchase price of the new car. The tax break would be phased-in in steps through 2015.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1259Increase licensure fees: Passed 33 to 5 in the Senate
To increase fees imposed on a wide range of businesses and occupations in which registration or licensure mandates are imposed as a condition of operating the firm or earning a living in the profession. This is one of a number of such bills passed by the House and Senate this week, which technically repeal the sunsets of previously enacted “temporary” fee increase laws, and are related to the budget for the next fiscal year. According to the House and Senate Fiscal Agencies, the bills would extract $15 to $20 million annually from business owners and tradesmen.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4934Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation: Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate
To require classes in public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance each day. The bill would prohibit compelling a student to recite the pledge. The Senate has also passed Senate Bill 637, to require a flag in each classroom.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5400Appropriate money for fruit grower loan subsidies: Passed 103 to 2 in the House 
To appropriate a $15 million for low-interest loan subsidies for fruit growers and producers who suffered extensive crop damage in 2012 due to an extended March warm spell followed by a hard freeze.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5617Expand state home improvement loan subsidy program: Passed 82 to 22 in the House 
To expand the authority of the Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) to provide government loan guarantees on home improvement loans to individuals with “low and moderate income.” Specifically, the bill would increase the family income cap for such loans to 175 percent of the statewide median gross income ($105,700), up from the current cap of $65,000 (or $74,750 in a designated “distressed area), and allow for a 30-year repayment period instead of 20 years.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5697Establish athlete concussion “time out” criteria: Passed 104 to 1 in the House
To require coaches or other adults in charge to remove a student or young athlete from participation in a sports activity due to a suspected concussion until clearance is received from an "appropriate health professional." The bill would also require schools and youth sports associations to distribute specified educational materials about concussions to coaches, young athletes and parents, and require parents and athletes to sign a statement indicating they have read them. The bill would not apply to the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA), which has separate concussion guidelines.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 797Cap municipal pension board travel expenses and more: Passed 104 to 1 in the House
To cap municipal and state pension board spending on board members' travel and training expenses at $150,000 per year, and $30,000 maximum per board member. The bill also proposes specific pension system transparency requirements; restricts payments to service providers who made large political contributions; increases limits on how much can be invested in real estate, "private equity" and global equities; establishes other regulations on investment service providers; and more.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5818Increase licensure fees: Passed 88 to 16 in the House.
To increase fees imposed on a wide range of businesses and occupations in which registration or licensure mandates are imposed as a condition of operating the firm or earning a living in the profession. This is one of a number of such bills passed by the House and Senate this week, which technically repeal the sunsets of previously enacted “temporary” fee increase laws, and are related to the budget for the next fiscal year. According to the House and Senate Fiscal Agencies, the bills would extract $15 to $20 million annually from business owners and tradesmen.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visithttp://www.MichiganVotes.org.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1214Authorize Attorney General challenge of parole board decisions: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To authorize the state Attorney General (in addition to the crime victim and prosecutor) to challenge a state parole board decision, with an “abuse of discretion” standard for such challenges.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4934Require school Pledge of Allegiance recitation: Passed 103 to 5 in the House
To require classes in public schools to recite the Pledge of Allegiance each day. The bill would prohibit compelling a student to recite the pledge. The House also passed Senate Bill 637, to require a flag in each classroom.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5582Establish that military experience meets certain licensure requirements: Passed 108 to 0 in the House 
To establish that having recent and relevant military experience in the field meets the criteria for obtaining an “electrical journeyman's license.” The House passed two other bills allowing the same for plumbers and security guards. Current law prohibits a person from earning a living as an electrician without obtaining “8,000 hours of experience over at least four years," or 6,000 hours for plumbers, plus passing licensure tests and paying fees.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5523Ban employers or schools asking for Facebook passwords: Passed 108 to 0 in the House
To prohibit employers and schools from requesting or requiring employees or students to disclose their social networking account passwords, login information or other security information, subject to penalties up to 93 days in jail and a $1,000 fine, plus lawsuit liability. An employee could be disciplined or fired for transferring the employer's proprietary, confidential or financial information to a personal internet account.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visithttp://www.MichiganVotes.org.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1040Revise school pension system: Passed 21 to 16 in the Senate
To no longer provide post-retirement health benefits to new school employees, and instead give them a 401(k) contribution equal to 2 percent of their salary. Also, current retirees who are over age 65 on Jan. 1, 2013 would have to contribute 20 percent to the cost of these health benefits, up from 10 percent now. The bill would also authorize “prefunding” these retiree health benefits (despite them being optional and not an enforceable obligation on the state). In addition, current school employees would have to contribute more toward their pensions, or else receive benefits calculated under a less generous formula. The original Senate-passed provision to “close” the school pension system to new hires was not adopted.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1099Authorize additional “administrative hearing bureau” penalties : Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate 
To allow a local government to garnish the wages of a property owner who has failed to pay fines imposed by “administrative hearing bureaus” that cities in Wayne County are allowed to create for enforcing property "blight” violations outside of clogged district courts. Other bills in this package would prohibit an owner from getting a building permit or zoning variance, and authorize additional civil and criminal penalties on a property owner.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4907Revise candidate filing deadlines to prevent party-switch gamesmanship: Passed 106 to 0 in the House
To set the reelection filing deadline for incumbent legislators (and some other offices) to a date two weeks before the deadline for challengers. If a lone challenger from the other party withdraws, the non-incumbent filing deadline would be extended an additional two days after the regular withdrawal deadline. This is in response to the situation of Rep. Roy Schmidt, who switched parties on the filing deadline date, leaving no Democratic challenger for this legislative district. The bill would also allow local party officials to pick a congressional candidate if a seat becomes vacant soon before the general election, saving the cost of a special primary election. It also extends the deadline for receipt of military and overseas absentee ballots if the local clerk sent these out late.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1040Revise school pension system: Passed 57 to 48 in the House
The final House vote on the school pension system bill described above. The bill made significant revisions to the system, but much less than the one in the original Senate-passed version.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting


Senate Bill 1040Senate vote on House pension reform proposal: Failed 16 to 22 in the Senate
To not concur with a House-passed version of the school pension reform bill, which sends the bill to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences. The main dispute is over the Senate-passed provision to “close” the school pension system to new hires, and instead give them a 401(k) account (as has been done for new state employees hired since 1997). The House instead proposes keeping a somewhat less generous "defined benefit" pension system for new employees.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5015Appropriate foreclosure lawsuit settlement money: Passed 31 to 6 in the Senate
To appropriate $88.8 million from a national mortgage foreclosure lawsuit settlement for various spending, including $25 million for urban “blight” reduction programs (of which $10 goes to Detroit), $20 million for home loan “debt counseling” and legal subsidies, $15 million for home loan subsidies, and more.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5566Increase school and local “deficit spending” debt: Passed 27 to 10 in the Senate 
To greatly increase the level of borrowing from the state that school districts and local governments can use to cover past and current deficit spending that exceeds annual revenues. Specifically, a $5 million annual cap on this state lending would increase to $85 million through 2018, and the maximum amount per loan would increase from $3 million to $20 million. Short term, this would primarily authorize state money for the Benton Harbor, Muskegon Heights, Highland Park and Pontiac school districts.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5015Appropriate foreclosure lawsuit settlement money: Passed 100 to 3 in the House
To appropriate $88.8 million from a national mortgage foreclosure lawsuit settlement for various spending, including $25 million for urban “blight” reduction programs (of which $10 goes to Detroit), $20 million for home loan “debt counseling” and legal subsidies, $15 million for home loan subsidies, and more.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1130Revise state “critical dunes” use restrictions: Passed 63 to 40 in the House 
To revise a law restricting the use by property owners of land considered to be “critical dunes.” Among other things this would require state approval of local regulations more restrictive than state ones, and allow use permits to be denied only when it is “more likely than not that the actual harm to the environment will significantly damage the public interest” according to burden of proof criteria specified in the bill.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

The Michigan Legislature has entered a summer recess. Many bills were passed in the legislative sessions just before the break.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 1129Authorize local “pension obligation bonds”: Passed 25 to 11 in the Senate
To allow local governments to borrow money to cover unfunded employee pension liabilities if the local has closed its traditional “defined benefit” pension system to new employees. Unlike other local government borrowing (usually called “bonding” or “selling bonds”), no vote of the people would be required.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5477Increase corporate subsidy overhead cap: Passed 29 to 7 in the Senate 
To increase from 15 percent to 25 percent a cap on the overhead expenses allowed for recipients under certain "Michigan Strategic Fund" corporate subsidy programs. Also, to require subsidy deals to contain more specific "claw-back" provisions requiring repayment of subsidies if specified performance measures are not met, the details of which would be open to the public. Finally, the bill would authorize investments or loans of taxpayer dollars to "micro-enterprise lenders."

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5414Establish more “dark sky preserves”: Passed 26 to 10 in the Senate 
To designate Wilderness State Park, a portion of Port Crescent State Park and certain state forestland in Emmet County as “dark sky preserves.” Also, to prohibit any "dark sky preserves" in the Upper Peninsula, or restrictions on motorized and other recreational use based on the designation.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4116Require review and posting of state agreements with feds: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To require that when entering any "memorandum of understanding," agreement, compact, or similar binding agreement between this state and the federal government or another state, a state agency must assert that it does not violate the state constitution, or exceed the agency's statutory authority. Information on each agreement would also be posted on a state web site.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5468Revise prepaid cell phone 9-1-1 tax: Passed 29 to 7 in the Senate 
To replace current taxes imposed on pre-paid cell phone service to cover the cost of government 9-1-1 service, with a new 1.92 percent levy imposed at the point of sale (like sales tax). The current 9-1-1 service tax regime would still apply to other kinds of cell phone accounts.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5714Authorize temporary administrative law drug bans: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate 
To give a state agency the power to ban a drug it says poses an “imminent danger” even though the legislature has not voted for a new law banning the drug, and to establish procedures for this.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5164End government inspections of non-motorized rental boats: Passed 31 to 6 in the Senate
To eliminate a requirement that rental boats that are non-motorized, including canoes, kayaks or rafts, must get government inspections. The bill would slightly increase the fees for annual rental motorboat inspections and revise other details of boat rental regulations.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 1146Expand historic vehicle registration discount during Dream Cruise month: Passed 109 to 1 in the House
To establish that during the month of August all vehicles 25 years old or more which are owned solely as a collectors item and not used for daily transportation will be considered “historic vehicles” for purposes of obtaining a discounted vehicle registration. During August, use restrictions associated with the discounted licenses would be waived.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 789Authorize temporary administrative law drug bans: Passed 107 to 0 in the House:

To give a state agency the power to temporarily ban a drug they say poses an “imminent threat,” even though the legislature has not voted for a new law banning the drug.>

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5701Expand auto theft prevention authority: Passed 96 to 12 in the House 
To expand the duties of a state automobile theft prevention authority to include insurance fraud related to unlimited medical benefits provided by Michigan's no-fault law, overhaul its structure and authorize $21 million in assessments (taxes) on insurers to pay for this.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5302Require local road agency reforms: Passed 63 to 45 in the House 
To make state funding of local road agencies contingent on their adopting “best practices,” including requiring employees to contribute a certain amount to their health insurance fringe benefit; capping the cost of employee retirement plans (watered-down from requiring that new employees get 401[k] plans rather than "defined benefit" pensions); and adopting specified transparency and accountability measures.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 1085Project labor ban “re-do”: Passed 63 to 44 in the House 
To “re-do” the law passed in 2011 prohibiting “project labor agreements” in state, school and local public construction projects, so as to circumvent a union lawsuit that has prevented enforcement of PLA ban. Project labor agreements require non-union contractors bidding on a government project to pay employee union dues and contribute to union pension and health insurance benefit funds, even though their employees are not union members.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting


House Bill 5699Cut state income tax: Passed 31 to 7 in the Senate
To move forward to Oct. 1 2013 an income tax cut from 4.35 percent to 4.25 percent that under current law will happen on Jan, 1, 2013.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5700Increase personal income tax exemption: Passed 32 to 6 in the Senate
To increase the personal income tax exemption from $3,700 to $3,950 on Oct. 1, 2012, and increase it to $4,000 on Jan. 1, 2014.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5246Expand corporate research subsidies: Passed 28 to 8 in the Senate
To authorize two additional “certified technology parks” ("smart zones"), in which revenues "captured" from other local governments using “tax increment financing” schemes are used to pay the debt service on money borrowed by a government authority to benefit particular "large corporate research" operations.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5541Borrow and spend more for university projects: Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate
To authorize $613 million in new government spending and debt for 18 state university construction projects.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5717Authorize fruit grower crop loss loans: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To authorize $15 million in state-subsidized low-interest loans for fruit growers and producers who suffered crop damage due to an extended March warm spell followed by a hard freeze.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5660Exempt frozen "drinks in pouch" from bottle deposit mandate: Passed 98 to 11 in the House 
To exclude frozen "drink a pouch" containers (such as a popular "Margarita in a pouch" beverage) from the state’s 10-cent bottle deposit mandate.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1052, Repeal state “beach grooming” regulations and restrictions: Passed 82 to 28 in the House
To essentially repeal state regulations mandating a permit for "beach grooming." The restrictions were passed in 2003 during a period of low Great Lakes water levels, when many lakefront property owners and resorts were unable to access or use beaches because of excessive weed growth.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5225Repeal pistol purchase permit mandate: Passed 74 to 36 in the House
To repeal the law that prohibits purchasing a pistol unless a person gets a "purchase permit" from local police. The bill would also require police departments to destroy the records they have accumulated under this law.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 248Limit state government land ownership: Passed 58 to 52 in the House
To cap the amount of state-owned Department of Natural Resources land at 4,650,000 acres, with some exceptions, and 3,910,000 acres north of a line between Mason and Arenac counties. Also, to require the DNR to post on its website how much land it owns and to develop a strategic plan to guide the acquisition and disposition of state lands.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 803Require voters to affirm citizenship: Passed 67 to 43 in the House
To require voters to affirm that they are a U.S. citizen when voting or applying for an absentee ballot.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 754Regulate “third-party voter registration organizations”: Passed 66 to 43 in the House
To require “third-party voter registration organizations” to register with the state, turn in late registrations within 48 hours, provide their “voter registration agents” with state approved instruction in proper procedures, and require their agents to sign a statement affirming receipt of this instruction. This measure was introduced in response to widespread reports of alleged vote fraud committed by the ACORN organization's voter registration arm. The bill would also require a person to show a photo identification when registering in person to vote.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5711Impose more abortion regulations: Passed 70 to 39 in the House
To require an abortion provider to ask a woman seeking an abortion if her husband, relatives, employer, the father or putative father, his parents or any other individual in a position of authority has threatened, intimidated, or coerced her into seeking an abortion, and require the Department of Community Health to produce information, screening tools, and protocols for this. Also, to impose more rigorous state “freestanding surgical outpatient facility” regulations on clinics that perform at least six abortions per month. Finally, the bill would establish that the remains of an aborted fetus are subject to the same laws that apply to the disposition of dead bodies of humans who have been born.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 316Require kindergartners be 5 on Sept. 1: Passed 66 to 44 in the House
To require children to be age 5 by Sept. 1 to attend kindergarten, rather than by Dec. 1 under current law. This earlier age cut-off would be phased in one month at a time over three years, starting in 2013. A child who would have been eligible under the current requirements could still attend if the parents "opt in" by notifying the school by June 1. The phase-in and "opt-in" was negotiated because school districts get money from the state for each kindergartner, whose numbers would be reduced during the transition period.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5729Cut state income tax rate: Passed 97 to 13 in the House 
To gradually cut the state individual income tax rate until it reaches 3.9 percent on Jan. 1, 2018.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1040Revise school employee retirement system: Passed 57 to 47 in the House 
To no longer provide post-retirement health benefits to new school employees, and instead give them a 401(k) contribution equal to 2 percent of their salary. Also, current retirees who are under age 65 on Jan. 1, 2013 would have to contribute 20 percent to the cost of these health benefits, up from 10 percent now. The bill would also authorize “prefunding” these retiree health benefits (which are optional and not an enforceable obligation on the state); the annual amount is not specified but is probably $100-$200 million. In addition, current school employees would have to contribute more toward their pensions, or else receive benefits calculated under a less generous formula. The House did not adopt a Senate-passed provision to “close” the school pension system to new hires and instead give them a 401(k) account (as has been done for new state employees hired since 1997).

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting


Senate Bill 1125Authorize more state government housing subsidy debt: Passed 33 to 5 in the Senate
To increase from $3 billion to $4.2 billion the amount of debt the Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) may incur in performing its role of providing taxpayer-backed mortgage loan guarantees, subsidies to certain developers and more.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 620Authorize “parent trigger” charter school conversion of failing schools: Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate
To require a public school that is in the lowest-achieving 5 percent of schools statewide to be essentially converted into a charter school if 60 percent of the parents sign a petition requesting this, or 51 percent of the parents plus 60 percent of the teachers. Employees in the resulting "conversion school" would not be subject to the district's union contract or necessarily included in the state-run school pension system. Republicans Caswell, Emmons, Hansen, Jones, Rocca and Schuitmaker joined all Democrats in voting "no."

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1146Expand historic vehicle registration discount during Dream Cruise month: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To establish that during the month of August all vehicles 25 years old or more which are owned solely as a collectors item and not used for daily transportation will be considered “historic vehicles” for purposes of obtaining a discounted vehicle registration.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1130, Revise state “critical dunes” use restrictions: Passed 26 to 12
To revise a law restricting the use by property owners of land considered to be “critical dunes.” Among other things this would prohibit local regulations more restrictive than state ones, and allow use permits to be denied only when it is “more likely than not that the actual harm to the environment will significantly damage the public interest” according to burden of proof criteria specified in the bill.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5009Exempt senior center poker from (private) gambling ban: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To exempt low stakes card games (25-cent maximum “ante” and $5 maximum "pot" and initial "buy-in") in government (but not private) senior centers from state prohibitions on (private) gambling. Under current law the exemption applies only to senior citizen housing facilities.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 859Regulate “portable electronic device” extended warranty plans: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To impose new regulations on extended warranty and service plans sold to cover portable electronic devices. The bill would define these agreements as “insurance” and regulate them under the same comprehensive regulatory regime imposed on the sale of regular insurance policies.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 984Repeal ban on non-contiguous state long gun purchase: Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate
To repeal a prohibition on Michigan residents buying rifles or shotguns in another state unless it is contiguous with Michigan. Under the bill, Michigan residents could buy long guns in any state.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 53722012-2013 state education budget: Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate
The state K-12, college and university budgets for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, 2012. House Bill 5365 authorizes the rest of state government spending. This bill appropriates $12.944 billion for K-12 public schools, compared to $12.359 billion the previous year; $1.399 billion for state universities, compared to $1.364 billion the previous year; and $294 million for community colleges, vs. $283 million the previous year. Of these amounts, $1.798 billion is federal money, and $1.839 billion comes from Michigan taxpayers.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 53722012-2013 state education budget: Passed 58 to 51 in the House
The state K-12, college and university budgets for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, 2012. See previous vote for details.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 351, Earmark some sales tax money to roads: Passed 71 to 37 in the House
To earmark up to $100 million of sales tax revenue realized from fuel sales to road projects each year, based on a formula specified in the bill

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5223Require drug testing of welfare applicants: Passed 71 to 37 in the House
To require drug testing of recipients of state welfare benefits if an "empirically validated screening tool" suggests a reasonable suspicion, and prohibit benefits if a person tests positive.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5548Increase health benefit contribution by retired legislators: Passed 100 to 8 in the House 
To require former legislators receiving the lifetime health insurance benefits granted at age 55 to those who spent at least six years in office to pay 20 percent of the cost, rather than the current 10 percent. This benefit was recently repealed for future legislators, although the state Senate succeeded in amending it so that 36 out of 38 current state Senators and 14 out of 110 current House members will still get the benefit.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5246Expand corporate research subsidies: Passed 87 to 20 in the House
To authorize two additional “certified technology parks” ("smart zones") in which “tax increment financing” would be used to pay the debt on money borrowed by a government authority to benefit particular "large corporate research" operations.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5541Borrow more for university projects: Passed 85 to 23 in the House 
To authorize $613 million in new government debt for 18 state university construction projects.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5705Use Detroit utility tax for streetlights instead of pay income tax: Passed 92 to 14 in the House
To allow $12.5 million in annual revenue from a Detroit utility tax originally intended pay for police officers to instead be used to pay for the streetlights provided by the municipal lighting authority proposed by House Bill 5688. This bill also requires passage of another one (Senate Bill 970) which would allow Detroit to raise its city income tax to 3.0 percent for residents and 1.5 percent for non-residents who work in the city.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5699Cut state income tax: Passed 103 to 5 in the House
To move forward to Oct. 1 2013 an income tax cut from 4.35 percent to 4.25 percent that under current law will happen on Jan, 1, 2013. Also, to increase the personal income tax exemption from $3,700 to $3,950 on the same date. All told, this would save taxpayers $103 million this year.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5566Increase school and local “deficit spending” debt: Passed 73 to 34 in the House
To greatly increase the level of borrowing from the state that school districts and local governments can use to cover “deficit spending” that exceeds their current revenues. Specifically, a $5 million annual cap on this state lending would increase to $100 million each year through 2018, and the maximum amount per loan would increase from $3 million to $20 million.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visithttp://www.MichiganVotes.org.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting


House Bill 53652012-2013 state budget (non-education part): Passed 20 to 16 in the Senate
The non-education part of an "omnibus" state government budget for the fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1, 2012. (House Bill 5372 contains school, college and university spending.) This would appropriate $34.355 billion, compared to $33.022 billion the previous year. Of this, $16.237 billion comes from state tax, fee and other revenue, and the rest is federal money ($18.118 billion, compared to $17.469 billion the previous year).

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 961K-12 public schools budget: Passed 20 to 16 in the Senate

The House-Senate conference report for the school aid budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $12.944 billion, compared to $12.659 billion the previous year. The bill would increase the per-pupil foundation grant to school districts that currently get less than average by $120, and other districts would get smaller increases based on student performance and their adoption of fiscal best practices.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 951Department of Corrections budget: Passed 20 to 16 in the Senate
The Department of Corrections budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, 2012. This appropriate $2.000 billion in gross spending, compared to $1.936 billion enrolled in 2011. A Senate-passed plan to save money by outsourcing the management of one prison was not agreed to by the House. This conference report was also folded into House Bill 5365.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 4096Place state spending information on-line: Passed 110 to 0 in the House
To require the state to post online a free searchable database containing the details of all agency purchases, contracts and grants.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5196Require government & school employee compensation disclosures: Passed 110 to 0 in the House
To require schools and local governments post online the number of employees in each job classification, total annual wages paid, the annual cost of benefits, and the terms of any severance agreement. The bill was introduced after a Wayne County political appointee severance pay scandal.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5660Exempt "drinks in bag" from bottle bill: Passed 91 to 19 in the House
To exclude "drink in a bag" containers from the state’s 10-cent bottle deposit mandate. Specifically, containers made of aluminum and plastic, or aluminum and paper, where the aluminum represents less than 20 percent of the unfilled container weight, and less than 5 percent of the total weight of the filled container.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 4513Require kindergartners be 5 on Sept. 1: Passed 64 to 45 in the House
To require children to be age 5 by Sept. 1 to attend kindergarten, rather than by Dec. 1 under current law. This earlier age cut-off would be phased in one month at a time over three years, starting in 2013. A child who would have been eligible under the current requirements could still attend if the parents "opt in" by notifying the school by June 1. The phase-in and "opt-in" was negotiated because school districts get money from the state for each kindergartner, whose numbers would be reduced during the transition period

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 53652012-2013 state budget (non-education part): Passed 61 to 49 in the House
The non-education part of an "omnibus" state government budget for the fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1, 2012. (House Bill 5372 contains school, college and university spending.) This would appropriate $34.355 billion, compared to $33.022 billion the previous year. Of this, $16.237 billion comes from state tax, fee and other revenue, and the rest is federal money ($18.118 billion, compared to $17.469 billion the previous year).

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" 

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting


Senate Bill 1052Repeal state “beach grooming” regulations and restrictions: Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate
To essentially repeal state regulations mandating a permit for "beach grooming." The restrictions were passed in 2003 during a period of low Great Lakes water levels, when many lakefront property owners and resorts were unable to access or use beaches because of excessive weed growth.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 4653Ban office-holder names on polling place materials: Passed 35 to 1 in the Senate
To prohibit the name of an elected or appointed official from being printed on any election-related material that is posted, displayed, or distributed in a polling place on Election Day, subject to fines of $100 to $250.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 300Restrict credit score use in insurance underwriting: Passed 103 to 4 in the House
To prohibit insurers from using “credit information” (under a broad definition of that term contained in the bill) to deny, cancel or choose to not renew a policy. Also, to impose restrictions, plus requirements for credit-status confirmation, disclosures and more, on an insurer using credit or credit-based “insurance scores” to determine the price at which it will sell an insurance policy.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5611Allow alcohol at 2013 NHL “Winter Classic” in Michigan Stadium: Passed 105 to 3 in the House
To allow the sale of alcohol at the Jan. 1, 2013 National Hockey League “Winter Classic” game to be held in the University of Michigan football stadium in Ann Arbor. The nationally televised hockey game will be between the Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visithttp://www.MichiganVotes.org.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 1040Adopt school employee pension reforms: Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate
To close the current "defined benefit" public school pension system to new employees hired starting in 2013, and instead give them 401(k) accounts with employer contributions equal to 4 percent of salary. New hires also would no longer be eligible for retirement health insurance benefits, but instead would get extra contributions into their 401(k) accounts. Current retirees would have to pay 20 percent of the cost for their health benefits, up from 10 percent now. Current school employees would have to contribute more toward their pensions, or else receive benefits calculated under a less generous formula.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 1040"Prefund" school retiree health benefits: Failed 18 to 20 in the Senate
Amendment offered by Sen. Gretchen Whitmer to strip out a provision of the school pension reform bill that would end post-retirement health insurance benefits for new employees hired starting in 2013, and instead make annual contributions sufficient to prefund these benefits (which under current law are optional). Reportedly the annual prefunding amount would be around $500 million. Last year, providing these optional benefits to current retirees cost $795 million.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 939Give special treatment to firms submitting to “environmental leader” process: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To give certain businesses special treatment in awarding state contracts, eligibility for government subsidies, environmental permit and inspection mandates, and more, if the firm submits itself to a government “environmental leader” designation process. This would require a company to demonstrate that it has no outstanding permit violations or serious past ones, adopt certain practices not required by law, submit to certain additional reporting mandates, participate in “workshops,” etc.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 127Vehicle trade-in “sales tax on the difference” only: Passed 37 to 1 in the Senate
To exempt from sales tax the value of a trade-in on the purchase of a new motor vehicle or titled watercraft. The buyer would only pay tax on the difference between the value of the trade-in and the purchase price of the new item. The tax cut would be phased in biannual installments through the end of 2017.

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5477Revise corporate subsidy program details: Passed 97 to 12 in the House
To increase from 15 percent to 25 percent a cap on the overhead expenses allowed for recipients under certain "Michigan Strategic Fund" corporate subsidy programs. Also, to require subsidy deals to contain more specific "claw-back" provisions requiring repayment of subsidies if specified job creation, commercialization, or other metrics are not met, details of which would be on the public record and subject to the Freedom of Information Act. Finally, the bill would authorize investments or loans of taxpayer dollars to "micro-enterprise lenders."

  Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 1069Cut tax imposed on manufacturers' tools and equipment: Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate 
To eliminate (starting in 2015) the so-called “personal property tax” on tools and equipment used by manufacturing firms (including things like assembly lines), starting with new equipment acquired from the start of 2012. The bill would also phase out the tax on existing equipment over a seven-year period beginning in 2015. Senate Bill 1072 would earmark tax revenue that now pays for previously-granted “corporate welfare” tax breaks and subsidies to reimburse local governments for the proposed reduction in revenue caused by this tax cut. The “personal property tax” currently costs businesses statewide around $1.2 billion annually, which would eventually be reduced by around $470 million.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 1070Cut tax imposed on small business tools and equipment: Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate 
To exempt commercial businesses (including ones that aren't manufacturers) whose tools and equipment in a particular community have a taxable value of less than $40,000 from the so-called “personal property tax,” which is imposed at the same rate as regular property taxes on buildings and land. Senate Bills 1069 and 1071 would exempt all tools and equipment used by manufacturers from the tax. This is part of the package would save businesses around $70 million annually.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 933Exclude medical marijuana from workers comp insurance: Passed 35 to 2 in the Senate
To exclude medical marijuana treatment from reimbursement under the coverage provided to injured and disabled workers through the worker's compensation insurance that employers are required to maintain. Another bill in the package would exclude medical marijuana from the coverage provided to individuals seriously injured in vehicle wrecks under the state's no fault auto insurance law.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5164End government inspections of non-motorized rental boats: Passed 106 to 0 in the House 
To eliminate a requirement that rental boats that are non-motorized, including canoes, kayaks or rafts, must get government inspections. The bill would slightly increase the fees for annual rental motorboat inspections, and revise other details of boat rental regulations.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 768Ban electronic cash register dirty tricks devices: Passed 107 to 0 in the House
To prohibit the possession, manufacture or sale of an automated sales suppression device (also called a “zapper” or “phantom-ware”), defined as a “software program carried on a memory stick or removable compact disc . . . that falsifies the electronic records of electronic cash registers and other point-of-sale systems.”

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Among other actions this week, the House and Senate in effect rejected all the budgets passed by the other body the previous week, which is a procedural means of getting these into conference committees to work out the differences. The goal is to complete work by June 1 on budgets for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 315Require kindergartners be 5 by Sept. 1: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To require children to be age 5 by Sept. 1 to attend kindergarten, rather than by Dec. 1 under current law. This earlier age cut-off would be phased in one month at a time over three years, starting in 2013. A child who would have been eligible under the current requirements could still attend if the parents "opt in" by notifying the school by June 1. The phase-in and "opt-in" was negotiated because school districts get money from the state for each kindergartner, whose numbers would be reduced during the transition period.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4594Restrict insurance company use of consumer credit scores: Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate
To prohibit insurers from using “credit information” under a broad definition of that term contained in the bill to deny, cancel or choose to not renew a policy. Also, to impose restrictions, plus requirements for credit-status confirmation, disclosures and more, on an insurer using credit or credit-based “insurance scores” to determine the price at which it will issue an insurance policy.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 802Require state agencies post spending plans online: Passed 27 to 11 in the Senate
To require state agencies to submit and get approval within 60 days of their annual budget's enactment of a spending plan that includes a "schedule" or list of programs covered under each line item, and the amount they plan to spend on each.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4925Expand allowable ORV road-shoulder riding locations: Passed 84 to 26 in the House 
To expand a law that allows counties in the northern part of the state to allow off road vehicles to be driven on the shoulder of some or all streets and roads, so that it would be available to all counties statewide. The bill would also eliminate a 2013 sunset on this law.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 269Raise small claims cap: Passed 107 to 2 in the House
To gradually increase the maximum amount that may be recovered in small claims court from $3,000 to $7,000, with the increase coming in several steps from 2012 through 2024. In small claims court actions a lawyer is neither required or allowed, which makes them more accessible to regular people; as introduced the bill would have increased the cap to $10,000 immediately.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5468Revise prepaid cell phone contract 9-1-1 tax: Passed 106 to 3 in the House
To replace current taxes imposed on pre-paid cell phone service to cover the cost of government 9-1-1 service, with a new 1.92 percent levy imposed at the point of sale (like sales tax). The current 9-1-1 service tax regime would still apply to other kinds of cell phone accounts.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4851Revise medical marijuana law regulations: Passed 105 to 4 in the House
To prohibit a doctor from prescribing medical marijuana unless there is a “bona fide physician-patient relationship,” as defined in the bill. This would require the doctor to get the patient's medical history, perform a physical and keep records. The bill also requires medical marijuana grown outside to be securely locked in a fenced area, and when transported to be in the trunk or a case inaccessible to vehicle occupants.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 961Senate version of next year's public school budget: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate
The Senate version of the public school budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $12.71 billion, compared to $12.66 billion originally authorized for this year, and $12.68 billion proposed by Gov. Rick Snyder. The bill would increase the per-pupil foundation grant by between $116 and $232, depending on how much school districts currently receive. Both the House and Senate versions of this budget watered down and reduced the dollar amounts of "best practices" grants proposed by Gov. Rick Snyder, which make a portion of the money contingent on adopting specified fiscal and transparency reforms.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 961Hopgood amendment to increase school spending: Failed 16 to 22 in the Senate 
To increase the spending proposed in the Senate School Aid budget by $495 million, and increase per-student spending by $300. Republicans Green, Hansen, Jones and Rocca joined all Democrats in supporting the amendment.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 951Senate prison budget: Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate
The Senate version of the Department of Corrections budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $1.991 billion, compared to $1.936 billion this year. The budget includes provisions that could result in placing some prisoners in a private prison, which is strongly opposed by the SEIU-affiliated prison guard union. Republicans Casperson, Caswell, Emmons, Kahn, Nofs and Walker joined all Democrats in opposing this budget.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 951Anderson anti-prison privatization amendment: Failed 15 to 23 in the Senate
To increase the procedural barriers to privatizing a prison or particular functions in a non-privatized prison. Among other things, the department would be prohibited from realizing savings through privatization unless this saves more than 10 percent compared to the current cost. Republicans Casperson, Emmons and Nofs joined all Democrats in supporting the amendment.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 949, Anderson community college fund-source amendment: Failed 19 to 19 in the Senate
To not use tax revenues earmarked to the state School Aid Fund in next year's community colleges budget, but instead use non-earmarked revenue. Although under the state constitution the SAF is "exclusively for aid to school districts, higher education, and school employees’ retirement systems," the public school establishment contends that the 1994 Proposal A initiative earmarking a sales tax increase to the SAF means it can only be used for K-12 schools. Republicans Caswell, Colbeck, Green, Hansen, Jones, Nofs and Rocca joined all Democrats in support.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5189Water-down local government reform "incentive grants": Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To water-down the requirement in the state budget enacted for the current fiscal year that local governments must adopt certain fiscal and transparency reforms as a condition of receiving the portion of state revenue sharing distributions not required by the state constitution. In particular, the bill essentially eliminates the "incentive grant" requirement that municipal employees must contribute at least 20 percent toward the cost of their health insurance fringe benefits.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 619Increase online charter "cyber-school" enrollment cap: Passed 56 to 54 in the House
To gradually increase the number of Michigan students who may take advantage of online public “cyber schools.” Under current law, this is limited to just two online charter schools and 1,000 students statewide. The bill would increase this to 15 schools and not more than 2 percent of the state's public school students, subject to various additional restrictions. It would also allow community colleges, school districts and intermediate school districts to create online charter schools serving students anywhere in the state.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5414Establish more “dark sky preserves”: Passed 80 to 28 in the House
To designate Wilderness State Park, a portion of Port Crescent State Park in Huron County, and state forestland in Emmet County as “dark sky preserves.” The term is not defined in statute, but in general it means restricting outdoor lighting to a minimum.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5189Water-down local government reform "incentive grants": Passed 96 to 9 in the House
To water-down the requirement in the state budget enacted for the current fiscal year that local governments must adopt certain fiscal and transparency reforms as a condition of receiving the portion of state revenue sharing distributions not required by the state constitution. In particular, the bill essentially eliminates the "incentive grant" requirement that municipal employees must contribute at least 20 percent toward the cost of their health insurance fringe benefits.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5365House version of next year's state budget: Passed 58 to 52 in the House
The House version of the non-education portion of the state government budget for the fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $34.195 billion, compared to $33.14 billion originally authorized for this year. Of this, $15.03 billion comes from state tax, fee and other revenue, compared to $15.63 billion the previous year. The rest of this budget is federal money ($18.11 billion, compared to $17.52 billion the previous year).

While both the House propose slightly less spending in many areas than Gov. Rick Snyder, they also watered down the "best practices" incentive grants he proposed, which make some of the money distributed to schools, local governments and universities contingent on their adopting specified fiscal and transparency reforms.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5372House version of next year's education budget: Passed 56 to 54 in the House
The House version of the K-12 public school, community college and university budgets for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $12.81 billion for K-12 public schools, compared to $12.66 billion originally authorized for this year and $12.68 billion proposed by Gov. Rick Snyder.

The bill also appropriates $1.39 billion for state universities, compared to $1.36 billion enacted for this year. Community colleges would get $294 million vs. $283 million this year.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

In both the House and Senate, this week was dominated by appropriations committee deliberation on the state budget for the fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1. There were only a few final-passage floor votes on noteworthy bills, or ones of general interest.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

House Bill 4393Give drunk minors immunity if they turn themselves in: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate 
To extend immunity from “minor in possession” of alcohol and related laws for a drunk minor who shows up at a health facility for observation or treatment. This would also apply a friend who accompanies the drunk one, or who contacts the proper authorities.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5245Increase penalty on delinquent hotel marketing tax: Passed 83 to 26 in the House 
To increase from 1.5 percent to 3.0 percent the monthly "delinquency charge" imposed on a hotel or motel owner who is late paying a room tax imposed to pay for regional marketing schemes, or to pay the debts of regional convention facilities. (For Detroit metro area lodging facilities this means Cobo Hall debt.) The "delinquency charge" is imposed on top of a 1.5 percent per month interest charge. As introduced by Rep. Wayne Schmidt, the bill would have increased this extra charge to 10 percent per month.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 29Allow concealed pistol permit holders to keep and bear tasers: Passed 106 to 4 in the House
To allow holders of concealed pistol licenses (CPLs) to also keep and bear tasers (electro-muscular disruption devices), subject to the same regulations and restrictions that apply to legally carrying concealed pistols, plus the requirement to obtain training in the use and effects of tasers. Under current law, citizens who are not law enforcement officers are prohibited from possessing tasers.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week. Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 291Final vote on repeal motorcycle operation: Passed 24 to 14 in the Senate 
To repeal the mandatory helmet requirement for a motorcycle operator who is age 21 or older, has been riding for at least two years or passes a safety test, and has a personal injury insurance policy providing at least $20,000 in benefits. This vote sends the measure to Gov. Snyder for approval or veto.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 351
Earmark some sales tax money to roads: Passed 26 to 11 in the Senate 

To earmark a specified portion of sales tax revenue to road projects. Depending on the average price of fuel, this would provide between $100 million and $140 million annually for road projects (or more if prices go higher).

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 135
Revise abortion parental authority waiver: Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate 

To require a court considering a petition from a minor for authority to get an abortion over the objection of her parents to consider the rebuttable presumption that a minor is not capable of providing informed consent for medical treatment. A waiver of parental denial could only be granted if the girl demonstrates a level of maturity based on various specified factors, or if her parents are neglectful or abusive. A girl whose petition was denied could not seek a waiver in another court division, but could appeal to a higher court. Gov. Jennifer Granholm vetoed a very similar bill in 2004.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 4803
Sell state fairgrounds: Passed 34 to 4 in the Senate 

To transfer the state fairgrounds in Detroit to a Michigan "Land Bank Fast Track Authority" created by the legislature in 2003, which has extensive powers to assemble and dispose of tax reverted property. Alternatively, the state could sell the property itself at fair market value, or give it to a local government. The property could not be used for a horse or auto race track, casino, prison or railroad freight yard. Part of the sale is in Senate Bill 515.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 4601
Limit certain asbestos liability: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate 

To limit the liability of a company that had acquired another company which may have produced or sold asbestos in the past. The bill would prohibit a court from imposing asbestos damage judgments that exceed the value of the acquired company. Under current law a court can order damages up to the value of the entire enterprise, even if the acquired subsidiary represents only a small part of the overall firm's value.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 712
Ban welfare for big lottery winners  

To include money won in lottery or other gambling as part of “countable income” and/or assets for purposes of determining eligibility for food stamps and other state welfare benefits. With this week's votes on this bill, Senate Bill 711 and House Bill 5033, bans on welfare for big lottery winners go to Gov. Rick Snyder for approval or veto.


House Bill 5061
, Require photo I.D. when applying in person for absentee ballot: Passed 65 to 45 in the House 

To require a person to have photo identification when applying in person for an absentee ballot. A person with no I.D. could still get a ballot, but it would be considered "challenged" (meaning subject to confirmation of identity).

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


House Bill 5009
Exempt senior center poker from (private) gambling ban: Passed 106 to 4 in the House  

To exempt low stakes card games (25-cent maximum “ante” and $5 maximum "pot" and initial "buy-in") in government (but not private) senior centers from state prohibitions on (private) gambling. Under current law the exemption applies only to senior citizen housing facilities.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 981
Authorize autism-mandate insurance company subsidies: Passed 84 to 26 in the House 

To authorize state government subsidies to health insurance companies to compensate for the new coverage mandate proposed by Senate Bill 414, which would require insurers to include autism coverage in all policies. Any actual subsidy payments would have to be added to annual appropriations passed by the legislature.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 414
Impose autism insurance mandate: Passed 91 to 19 in the House 

To impose a new coverage mandate that would require health insurance policies to include coverage for treatments related to autism, and ban higher deductibles or lower benefit levels for this than for other ailments. Senate Bill 981 would authorize state subsidies to insurance companies to cover the extra cost.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"


Senate Bill 1018
Ban unionization of contractors paid with government subsidies: Passed 63 to 46 in the House  

To establish that a person whose private employment compensation comes from a direct or indirect government subsidy is not considered a government employee, and so is not subject to being inducted into a government employee union. Such a scheme involving home day care providers was ended by the Snyder administration subsequent to a Mackinac Center legal challenge, and the bill would (eventually) end a still-ongoing one extracting SEIU union dues from home health care providers who are mostly relatives of disabled individuals.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Interested in a cumulative list of all weekly Roll Call Report Votes for 2012?

 

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week. Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

Senate Bill 1018Ban unionization of contractors paid with government subsidies: Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate 
To establish that a person whose private employment compensation comes from a direct or indirect government subsidy is not considered a government employee, and so is not subject to being inducted into a government employee union. Such a scheme involving home day care providers was ended by the Snyder administration subsequent to a Mackinac Center legal challenge, and the bill would (eventually) end a still-ongoing one extracting SEIU union dues from home health care providers who are mostly relatives of disabled individuals.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 821, Reduce rental boat inspection mandates: Passed 33 to 5 in the Senate
To eliminate a requirement that rental boats which are non-motorized, including canoes and kayaks, must get government inspections. The bill would slightly increase the fees for mandated annual inspections of rental motorboats, and revise other details of boat rental regulations.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 596Criminalize teacher sex with adult student: Passed 36 to 2 in the Senate
To make it a crime for a teacher, school official, employee or volunteer to have sex with a student even if the student is not a minor and it is consensual. Under current law, this is illegal only if the student is under 18.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4803Sell state fairgrounds: Passed 101 to 7 in the House
To transfer the state fairgrounds in Detroit to a Michigan "Land Bank Fast Track Authority" created by the legislature in 2003, which has extensive powers to assemble and dispose of tax reverted property. Alternatively, the state could sell the property itself at fair market value, or give it to a local government. The property could not be used for a horse or auto race track, casino, prison, or railroad freight yard. Part of the sale is in Senate Bill 515.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 4289Lund "Obamacare statement" amendment: Failed 47 to 62 in the House
To add $9.8 million to an unrelated appropriations bill to create a state “Obamacare exchange,” which would administer the health insurance subsidy entitlement created by the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.” Note: The amendment and roll call vote were done at this time to allow representatives to make a "statement" on the federal health care law prior to U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments on it next week.

 Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

March 16, 2012, MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week. Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 756Ban hands-on cell phone use by new drivers: Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate
To prohibit an individual with a level 1 or 2 graduated drivers license status (new drivers age 17 or younger) from operating a motor vehicle while using a hands-on cell phone.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 414Impose autism insurance mandate: Passed 29 to 9 in the Senate
To impose a new coverage mandate that would require health insurance policies to include coverage for treatments related to autism, and ban higher deductibles or lower benefit levels for this than for other ailments. Senate Bill 981 would authorize state subsidies to insurance companies to cover the extra cost.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 981Authorize autism-mandate insurance company subsidies: Passed 28 to 10 in the Senate 
To authorize state government subsidies to health insurance companies to compensate for the new coverage mandate proposed by Senate Bill 414, which would require insurers to include autism coverage in all policies. Any actual subsidy payments would have to be added to annual appropriations passed by the legislature.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4266Allow yard waste in landfills with methane capture: Passed 66 to 41 in the House 
To waive a ban on landfills accepting yard waste if a facility installs a methane gas capture system.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4799Prohibit coercing a woman to have an abortion: Passed 72 to 37 in the House
To make attempting to coerce a woman into having an abortion a crime. The bill authorizes enhanced prison penalties for related threats of violence or "stalking," and fines for acts like threatening divorce or other living arrangement changes, withholding current or promised support, etc. Other bills in the package authorize lawsuits, require the state to produce informational materials and screening protocols and physicians to use them, and more.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 683Prefund (optional) state retiree health benefits: Passed 109 to 0 in the House
To appropriate $250.9 million to "prefund" optional post-retirement health insurance benefits the legislature has chosen to give state government retirees. Under current law, these benefits are paid each year out of regular state government revenue. Unlike pensions, the Supreme Court has ruled these are not "accrued benefits" and so may be eliminated or cut at any time; former employees who get them are still eligible for Medicare at age 65.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the House 

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the Senate

 

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, nonpartisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, nonpartisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visit http://www.MichiganVotes.org.

 

March 9, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week. Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

House Bill 4929, Ban using public school resources to deduct union dues: Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate; Passed 56 to 54 in the House
To prohibit school districts from using public resources (including their payroll processing systems) to deduct union dues or fees from employees’ pay, and then sending the money to a union. This practice is the current norm, so the bill would require unions to make alternative arrangements to collect dues from school employees. The Senate added a small appropriation, which makes the bill "referendum-proof" under a 2001 state Supreme Court decision. Republicans Casperson, Caswell, Colbeck, Green, Nofs and Proos joined all Democrats in voting "no."

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the Senate

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No' in the House

 

House Bill 4246, Limit unionization of student research assistants: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate; Passed 63 to 47 in the House 
To establish that state university graduate students who work as research assistants are not considered government employees for purposes of enrolling them into a union, if their work terms do not meet an IRS "20 factor test" for employee status. Originally introduced with a different purpose, the Senate amended this bill in a parliamentary maneuver to get the provision into law before U of M student researchers are unionized in an upcoming Michigan Employment Relations Commission meeting.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the Senate

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the House

 

Senate Bill 877, Authorize prison privatization: Passed 20 to 18 in the Senate
To allow, but not require, the Department of Corrections to privatize a prison, but only if it would save at least 10 percent. This could include a contract with a private prison in Baldwin whose previous state contract was revoked by Gov. Jennifer Granholm in 2005. Republicans Casperson, Caswell, Emmons, Hildenbrand, Jones, and Nofs joined all Democrats in voting “no.”

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4859, Give LP gas companies immunity from customer improper use: Passed 90 to 20 in the House
To extend immunity from liability to LP gas companies and employees for injuries or death to a customer who modifies, repairs or uses equipment improperly.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Interested in a cumulative list of all weekly Roll Call Report Votes for 2012?

 

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visit http://www.MichiganVotes.org.

Permission to reprint this blog post in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that the author (or authors) and the Mackinac Center for Public Policy are properly cited. Permission to reprint any comments below is granted only for those comments written by Mackinac Center policy staff.

 

 

March 2, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 971, Limit unionization of grad student research assistants: Passed 62 to 45 in the House
To establish that state university graduate students who work as research assistants are not considered government employees for purposes of enrolling them into a union, if their work terms do not meet an IRS "20 factor test" for employee status.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5335, Ban local government body “phone-in” voting: Passed 94 to 11 in the House
To establish that if a member of a public body is allowed to cast a vote on a decision by the body without being physically present, this is a violation of the state Open Meetings Act.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4134, Grant property tax breaks to residential developers: Passed 74 to 33 in the House
To exempt homes, condos and other "residential structures" built "on spec" by residential real estate developers from property tax until the property is occupied.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 778, Restrict ad hoc road-end “marinas”: Passed 96 to 11 in the House
To establish that unless a property deed or easement expressly provides for it, a waterfront road end may not be used for boat hoists or docks, overnight boat mooring, or any activity that obstructs access to the water.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4619, Bring unemployment benefits extension to a vote: Failed 44 to 62 in the House
A motion to bring to a vote by the full House a bill that would extend state unemployment benefits from 20 weeks to 26 weeks. This vote was on the motion, not the bill.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4846, Authorize fine on water-skier with no PFD: Passed 36 to 1 in the Senate
To authorize a $100 civil fine for operating a boat that is towing skiers or people on a raft who are not wearing personal flotation devices, and the same fine for a skier or towed raft rider age 16 or older who does not wear a life vest.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 712, Ban welfare for big lottery winners: Passed 26 to 10 in the Senate
To explicitly authorize in statute an existing asset cap for food stamp eligibility (currently $5,000); and also to include money won in lottery or other gambling as part of “countable income” for purposes of determining eligibility for food stamps and other state welfare benefits.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Feb. 24, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 971, Limit unionization of grad student research assistants: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To establish that state university graduate students who work as research assistants are not considered government employees for purposes of enrolling them into a union, if their work terms do not meet an IRS "20 factor test" for employee status.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 683, Pre-fund (optional) state retiree health benefits: Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate
To appropriate $250.9 million to "pre-fund" optional post-retirement health insurance benefits the legislature has chosen to give state government retirees. Under current law, these benefits are paid each year out of regular state government revenue. Unlike pensions, the Supreme Court has ruled these are not "accrued benefits" and so may be eliminated or cut at any time; former employees who get them are still eligible for Medicare at age 65.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 929, Revise “21st Century Jobs Fund” business subsidy program: Passed 35 to 2 in the Senate
To revise the procedures by which beneficiaries of the "21st Century Jobs Fund” business subsidy program are selected, transferring authority from “independent experts” to political appointees on the Michigan Strategic Fund board. The bill would also reduce program reporting requirements; reduce the amount grant recipients can spend for "overhead;" and make other changes.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 370, Bring unemployment benefits increase bill to a vote: Failed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To discharge a bill increasing state unemployment benefits from 20 weeks to 26 weeks from committee and bring it directly to the Senate floor for a vote.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4445, Provide transition classes to insolvent Highland Park Schools students: Passed 23 to 13 in the Senate; Passed 63 to 45 in the House.
To appropriate $4 million to pay school districts and charter schools near the effectively-bankrupt Highland Park school district to provide classes this year to the children in that district. Highland Park reportedly spent $16,000 per student, on revenues of $14,000 per student, and can no longer meet payroll. The bill also authorizes $12.5 million for programs intended to assess kindergarten and government "early childhood education" programs; spends $4 million in federal "edu-jobs" stimulus money; and makes several smaller appropriations. Finally, it adjusts school aid distributions to reflect lower than expected local property tax revenue and other factors.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the House

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No" in the Senate

  

House Bill 5033, Ban welfare for big lottery winners: Passed 67 to 39 in the House
To explicitly authorize in statute an existing $5,000 asset cap for food stamp eligibility; and also to include money won in lottery or other gambling as part of “countable income” for purposes of determining eligibility for food stamps and other state welfare benefits.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Feb. 17, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 752, Ban “stealth conventions” by minor political parties: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate

To require minor political parties to notify the Secretary of State of any upcoming county or state convention to nominate candidates. This would prohibit schemes like the “stealth convention” and candidate nominations organized by a fake “Tea Party” political party in 2010.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 750, Authorize criminal penalties for extreme campaign finance scofflaws: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To authorize criminal penalties for candidates and campaign treasurers who fail to file mandated campaign finance reports more than two years late. Contributions and other assets of the campaign committee would be subject to state seizure. These sanctions would only apply to campaign committees with balances of more than $20,000.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5085, Ban government sending payroll PAC money to union: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To prohibit the state, school districts and local governments from deducting money from an employee’s paycheck and contributing it to a union Political Action Committee (PAC). Government payroll systems could still be used to extract union dues and fees from employee paychecks and deliver them to the union.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 754, Regulate “third-party voter registration organizations”: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To require “third-party voter registration organizations” to register with the state, turn in late registrations within 24 hours, provide their “voter registration agents” with state approved instruction in proper procedures, and require their agents to sign a statement affirming receipt of this instruction. This measure was introduced in response to widespread reports of alleged vote fraud committed by the ACORN organization's voter registration arm. The bill would also require a person to show a photo identification when registering to vote.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 803, Require voters to affirm citizenship: Passed 30 to 8 in the Senate
To require voters to affirm that they are a U.S. citizen when voting or applying for an absentee ballot.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 602, Ban certain window blinds in child care centers: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To ban window blinds or other window coverings in child care centers if they have pull cords or inner cords capable of forming a loop and posing a risk of strangulation to a young child.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 603, Ban sale of certain window blinds: Passed 34 to 4 in the Senate
To prohibit the sale of window blinds that do not include cleats, hardware, and instructions for installation in a way that lets cords be secured, and a warning about the danger of accidental hanging or strangulation from a window blind cord that is not secured.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4601, Limit certain asbestos liability: Passed 62 to 46 in the House
To limit the liability of a company that had acquired another company which may have produced or sold asbestos in the past. The bill would prohibit a court from imposing asbestos damage judgments that exceed the value of the acquired company. Under current law a court can order damages up to the value of the entire enterprise, even if the acquired subsidiary represents only a small part of the overall firm's value.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Feb. 10, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

MichiganVotes.org sends a weekly report to newspapers and TV stations around the state showing how state legislators in their service area voted on the most important or interesting bills of the past week.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

House Bill 5075, Court consolidation package: Passed 34 to 4 in the Senate
To consolidate and reduce the number of judges in Michigan courts, as recommended by the State Court Administrative Office. This is one of several dozen bills reducing the number of Michigan judges in particular district, circuit and probate courts. Of little import to regular citizens, this is a matter of intense interest to county political establishments, which for more than a decade have succeeded in obstructing the reform despite widespread recognition the state has too many judgeships (and the costs associated with them). The bills are passing now with unanimous or near-unanimous votes.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 5125, Allow elimination of road commissions: Passed 63 to 41 in the House
To establish that a county road commission can be eliminated by a county board if the road commission's members are appointed, and eliminated by a vote of the people if they are elected. If either happens, the county board would assume the duty of managing the county's road system. Reportedly, Democratic opposition was (mostly) reversed when the Republican House Speaker made a deal to increase spending on government "early child education" programs by $12.5 million. 

 

House Bill 5142, Expand “corridor improvement” borrow/spend/tax authorities: Passed 100 to 6 in the House
To expand a 2005 law authorizing local “corridor improvement authorities” that can borrow for various government spending projects (generally but not necessarily related to mass transit), and then repay the loans with money levied in "special assessments" (property taxes), or with tax revenue "captured" from other local government taxing units by means of “tax increment financing" schemes. The bill would authorize multi-government versions of these authorities.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Jan. 27, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

Note: There will be no roll call report next week. Any noteworthy votes next week will be included in the Feb. 10 roll call report.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 204, Eliminate county commissioner vacancy special election requirement: Passed 26 to 12 in the Senate
To eliminate a requirement that a special election must be held when a county commissioner vacancy occurs during an odd numbered year. Under current law, special elections already are not required if the vacancy occurs in an even-nubered year (a regular election year, that is).

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 721, Impose "plastic bulk merchandise container” transaction regulations: Passed 38 to 0 in the Senate
To impose new recordkeeping and other regulations on the buying and selling of 10 or more "plastic bulk merchandise containers” such as those used by soft drink and bread manufacturers. Reportedly, people steal these and sell them to plastics recyclers.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4658, Repeal prison store sales tax exemption: Passed 93 to 13 in the House
To eliminate the sales tax exemption on purchases by prisoners at prison stores.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4116, Require review and posting of state agreements with feds: Passed 106 to 0 in the House
To require that before entering any memorandum of understanding, agreement, compact, or similar binding agreement between this state and the federal government or another state, a state agency must assert that the agreement does not violate the state constitution, and does not exceed the authority granted to the agency by the legislature. Information on each agreement would also be posted on a state web site. A requirement that the Attorney General approve each agreement was not included in the final bill.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4653, Ban office-holder names on election materials: Passed 106 to 0 in the House
To prohibit the name of an elected or appointed official from being printed on any election-related material that is posted, displayed, or distributed in a polling place on election day, subject to fines of $100 to $250. House Bill 4656 would apply the prohibition to absentee ballot materials given or mailed to a voter, and passed by the same margin.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 130, Ban drivers license renewal if three unpaid parking tickets: Passed 58 to 48 in the House
To reduce the number of unpaid parking tickets a person can have before the Secretary of State will not renew a driver license from six to three, which then requires paying an additional $45 "clearance fee." This vote sends the bill to the Governor for signature or veto.

Who Voted "Yes and Who Voted "No"

 

Jan. 20, 2012 MichiganVotes.org Weekly Roll Call

This legislative week was dominated by the Governor's State of the State address, with mostly pro-forma sessions surrounding it. A few comparatively minor bills were passed on Thursday.

Y = Yes, N = No, X = Not Voting

 

Senate Bill 778, Restrict ad hoc road-end “marinas”: Passed 30 to 6 in the Senate
To establish that unless a deed, easement, or other recorded dedication expressly provides for it, a waterfront road end may not be used for boat hoists or docks; for mooring between midnight and sunrise; or for any activity that obstructs access to a lake or stream. Local governments could ban or regulate uses that are not specified in property owners’ deeds, easements, etc.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

House Bill 4403, Revise jury duty detail: Passed 35 to 0 in the Senate
To require county jury boards to send a juror qualifications questionnaire to persons who previously failed to return the questionnaire. This would prevent jury duty dodgers from avoiding future calls to duty.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Senate Bill 717, Create new “hunters helping farmers” program: Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate
To create a new government program that matches farmers suffering excessive crop damage from deer with hunters who want to take more antlerless deer (as already permitted in specific cases for crop damage reduction purposes).

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

 

Share More …