One of the major fears that critics voice about implementing a widespread parental choice program is the notion that it will hurt minorities and economically disadvantaged students and benefit only those who least need it. The evidence demonstrates overwhelmingly that this is not the case. In his review of the Milwaukee Choice Program, Daniel McGroarty points out that through the first four years of Parental Choice in Milwaukee, an average of 92 percent of all children receiving choice vouchers were African-American or Hispanic.23 Chester Finn reports that in a sample of almost 8,400 charter school students across the states, 63 percent were members of a minority group.24 Many existing private schools located within cities have already opened their doors to minorities and the economically disadvantaged, offering full tuition scholarships to those demonstrating need. In addition, charter schools in Michigan and across the nation have been created expressly to serve populations that have traditionally been locked into an assigned government school. Fears of creating an elitist system are unfounded. Expanded school choice programs increase rather than decrease the range of students taking advantage of alternative schools.

One of the major fears that critics voice about parental choice is the notion that it will hurt minorities and economically disadvantaged students. The evidence demonstrates overwhelmingly that this is not the case.

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