One of my grandfathers (now deceased) used to be a member of of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, one of many such organizations that still dot the land, especially in small towns. I know his lodge to be a place where he would go to smoke, drink, bowl a few frames and talk with his buddies. I never knew about lodge medicine, a practice that is discussed in this short essay published by the Foundation for Economic Education. Lodge medicine was likely past its prime during his day (he was, after all, a member of a trades union).

I’m not sure that such an approach would be desirable today, but it’s interesting to note that its demise was due in part to anti-competitive (rent-seeking) behavior by doctors. It was later supplanted by workplace-centered insurance, which in turn grew due to the strong influence of the federal income tax code.

Cross-posted from State House Call.

Stay Engaged

Receive our weekly emails!

~~~~~

Related Articles:

Friedman Legacy Day

Planning for Life Workshop – Suttons Bay, MI

Michigan Adequacy Study Shows the State Already Spends Plenty on Education

Mackinac Center Weighs in on State’s Education Adequacy Study

How Bad Investment Rate Projections Cause Pension Underfunding

Here's What the NY Times Got Wrong On Detroit Public Schools

Share