Robert P. Hunter, J.D., LL. M, director of labor policy for the Mackinac Center of Public Policy, is an expert in all aspects of labor movement law and history, and leads the Center's Labor Policy Initiative.

Appointed by President Reagan to the National Labor Relations Board in 1981,where he adjudicated more than 3,000 labor law cases, Hunter also served as chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources and as chief legislative assistant to U.S. Senators Robert Taft and Orrin Hatch.

Hunter, who was appointed by Gov. John Engler to the Michigan Civil Service Commission, is a former faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University Graduate Business School and has served as labor policy advisor to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Society for Human Resource Management, and other organizations.

Mr. Hunter is admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and belongs to several state bar associations.  He received his law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School and he holds a master of laws degree from the New York University School of Law.

Paul S. Kersey, J.D., labor policy research associate at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, researches and analyzes labor and employment issues for the Center's Labor Policy Initiative.

After practicing law in Livonia, Mich. for several years, Kersey served on the staff of the Government Reform and Oversight Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives.  He then spent three years at the National Right to Work Committee as director of state legislation, where he analyzed and responded to labor legislation in all 50 states.

Mr. Kersey holds a bachelor of arts degree in economics from the University of Michigan  at Dearborn.  In 1993 he received his law degree from the University of Illinois.

Shawn P. Miller served as a research intern for Robert P. Hunter during the summer of  2001.  He possesses dual bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering and philosophy, and is currently in his first year of law school at the University of Notre Dame.