Bruce Walker, former managing editor of MichiganScience and currently the managing editor of the Heartland Institute’s InfoTech and Telecom News, writes in Tuesday’s Washington Times that true fans of National Public Radio would be more than happy to pay for the service in order to replace government subsidies.

“If NPR listeners ‘just like you’ — and me — want the luxury of listening to the radio without blocks of commercials and jabbering morning-drive-time hosts, we belong to a demographic that gladly would pay more than $1.35 a year for the pleasure,” he writes. “In fact, I’d venture to guess many of us wouldn’t mind forking over $1.35 a day to remain immersed in jazz, blues, folk, classical music and other fine NPR offerings. That would more than make up for the lost 10 percent of government largesse. I know I would donate far more than I have in the past.”

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