The Lansing State Journal reports that a "Sonic" restaurant chain outlet that was promised $90,000 in taxpayer-funded corporate welfare subsidies and tax breaks won't be opening after all in south Lansing. Sharp-eyed corporate welfare officials keeping close tabs on the situation realized this when they noticed that there were "for sale" signs posted on the favored parcel.

Existing, home-grown restaurant owners in the area — who pay their taxes in full and get no special privileges from the government — are no doubt relieved that they won't have to compete with a politically favored and subsidized outsider.

This would not be the first time governments in this state have unfairly discriminated against home-grown businesses by offering outside competitors special subsidies and tax breaks.


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