Results 21 to 40 of 1100

Many Emergency Orders To Fight COVID-19 Should Be Put Into Law For Good

As part of the state response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer changed some key regulations affecting health care. Michigan should enact these changes into law.

After the Virus: The Importance of Savings

Policymakers and others should consider ways to keep the economy strong.

Michigan Entered 2020 Stronger

Michigan’s legislators and governors have changed laws and regulations in recent years in ways that will help the state respond to the COVID-19 coronavirus.

Emergency Powers Under Michigan Law

Several state laws give Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer the authority to undertake certain steps during times of emergencies and disasters.

Climate Change Happens; Now What?

Efforts to address climate change should not ruin the economy or harm the environment.

New Report Card Shows Which Schools Are Doing the Most for Students

The Mackinac Center’s Context and Performance Report Card rewards school leaders whose students perform better than expected on state tests.

Limiting Local Government Revenue in a Democracy

Citizens have the power to decide how much their local governments collect in taxes.

The Working Class Is Not Worse Off Today Than During the Recession

A report from the United Way gives an unusual and unhelpful way to estimate the extent of poverty in Michigan.

Corporate Welfare Reform Legislation Introduced

Proposed laws now in the Michigan Legislature could reform the way Michigan subsidizes a few businesses in the name of creating jobs.

It’s Time to Improve the School Bond Election Process

School elections do not get enough attention from voters. Some reforms from state government could help.

2020: A New Day, or Groundhog Day?

Michigan lawmakers have only a few months to create a budget for the next fiscal year, address the Medicaid program and enact criminal justice reforms.

Michigan on Pace for Smallest Increase in Business Subsidies in Years

Legislators reduced some corporate welfare spending

In 2019, lawmakers dialed back taxpayer support for business subsidies, perhaps reflecting a change in thinking.

Lawmakers Should Not Resurrect Pure Michigan Subsidy Program

A legislator from northern Michigan wants the state to restart taxpayer funding of the Pure Michigan advertising campaign. Lawmakers should let its funding stay at the current level: zero.

The Unintended Results of Michigan’s Divided Government

A conflict between a Republican Legislature and a Democratic governor led to restrained growth in the state budget.

Regulatory Reforms on the Move in Michigan

Michigan has reformed some of the many licenses it requires for people to hold a job. Lawmakers should continue that work in the new year.

Students Led Astray by Environmental Education

A set of regulations and laws that a high school student proposed as part of a biology class suggests that Michigan schools should take a closer look at the environmental impact of renewable energy sources when teaching about the benefits.

Legislators Nix Regulatory Overreach of Rural Health Care Providers

Without the Legislature’s timely intervention, the commission’s decision threatened to make it more difficult for cancer patients in rural areas of Michigan to access this treatment.

Filling Classroom Vacancies Requires Better Solutions

Some Michigan classrooms lack a teacher with full credentials, even though many people with teaching credentials aren’t teaching. Rather than focusing heavily on producing more teachers, the state should find ways to entice some of those teachers into the classroom.

Keep Pure Michigan Spending at $0

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was right to veto funding for the Pure Michigan advertising campaign in the new state budget.

Utilities Have Big Solar Plans for Michigan but Overlook the Long-Term Costs

Michigan’s two big electric utilities cite their build-up of solar facilities as evidence of their environmental concern. But solar facilities pose significant environmental challenges, which the companies have not adequately prepared for.