Results 61 to 80 of 246

How Criminal Justice Works in Michigan

Criminal justice reform will continue to be a hot topic in Lansing this year, as lawmakers on the left and right advance various proposals for reforming the system. But in order to properly evaluate the potential for successful change, it’s important to understand the nuts and bolts of how the system currently operates.

Economic Freedom: What it is and Why it Matters

Public policy choices can have profound consequences on the decisions individuals make about their own opportunities — where to live, work, invest and raise families. What can government leaders do to influence those choices? Respect economic freedom.

National School Choice Week

Student displays, performances and testimonials will showcase the value Michigan families receive when they exercise choice to meet their educational needs.

Brews and Views

Join us for a panel discussion on the role of private efforts to protect and conserve natural areas and resources.

Planning for Life Workshop – Farmington Hills

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy announces our 2018 Planning for Life Workshops around Michigan.

Bail Reform: Improving Pretrial Release to Benefit Defendants and Taxpayers

Michigan’s system of bail and pretrial release is ripe for reform, but any changes to this complex structure require a thorough understanding of current practices and how they diverge from best practices. Analysts at the Mackinac Center and the ACLU of Michigan both published papers to inform the public about bail in our state, which they will present jointly.

The New Face of the FCC: Q&A with Chairman Ajit Pai

Ajit Pai is the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, but his philosophy is a bit different than many regulators. Pai’s regulatory philosophy values consumers, competition and markets over regulation, bureaucrats and central planning. His principles include being aware of “regulatory capture,” a free and fair system without dispensing favors and special treatment, flexible rulemaking, and rules which respect the laws of Congress.

Little Pink House Screening

Join the Mackinac Center for a private screening of the compelling film about small town heroes who challenged one of the nation’s largest pharmaceutical corporations and an overreaching government all the way to the Supreme Court.

Making Waves with the Mackinac Center

Join us for a sunset cruise and a free market discussion on energy and property rights.

Featuring: Jason Hayes, director of environmental policy at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.

Smart Regs for Smart Tech: How Government Can Allow Next Gen Internet Networks to Flourish

This panel will discuss issues related to the future of internet networks, including 5G cell service, “net neutrality” and broadband infrastructure. Panelists will also offer guidance on what governments at all levels — local, state and federal — should do (or not do) in relation to the future of internet connectivity and the spinoff technologies it makes possible.

Planning for Life Workshop – Bay Harbor Yacht Club

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy announces our 2018 Planning for Life Workshops around Michigan.

Planning for Life Workshop – Midland, MI

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy announces our 2018 Planning for Life Workshops around Michigan.

Beer Glut: The Overregulation of Alcohol in Michigan

Michigan’s rules about alcohol production, distribution and sales are complex. The state has restrictions on what can be produced, a strict monopoly system for distribution and imposes price controls on sellers. Many of these regulations were originally crafted some 80 years ago in the post-Prohibition era.

Why Prescription Drugs Are So Expensive and What the State Can Do About It

In recent years the price consumers pay for many brand name prescription drugs and even some generics has increased. There are several factors behind these increases. One has to do with the type of the drugs being developed today and the smaller number of patients they target. Another involves middlemen that absorb many of the price discounts provided by drug makers. And a third has to do with the regulations coming from both Washington and the states.

An Evening with the Mackinac Center

Join us for an evening of fellowship among friends of liberty.

Pump the Brakes: Michigan Should Rethink Driver's License Suspensions

In 2010, Michigan suspended over 475,000 licenses – one for every 15 drivers. Over 95 percent of those suspensions were for offenses unrelated to driving. Today, 86 percent of Americans use a car or motorcycle to get to work, meaning that a suspended license puts them at serious risk of job loss and other hardships.

A Politically Incorrect Guide to Communism

For decades after the end of the "Great War," communism was on the march. Bolshevik Russia expanded its territory into large segments of Eastern Europe, Chairman Mao took China, and one-party rule dominated in much of Asia, Latin America and Africa. Cuba, a close U.S. ally merely 100 miles from Florida, launched a communist dictatorship that is now nearly six decades old.

State-led Health Care Reforms

Facing seemingly endless paralysis on health care reform from the federal government, a growing number of states are starting to consider reforms that they could enact to improve the provision of health care for their residents. Although federal laws and rules dominate health care regulations, there are still several worthy reforms that states could pursue that would have the effect of lowering costs and expanding choices for patients.

Raising the Age: Should 17-Year-Olds be Eligible for Juvenile Justice in Michigan?

Michigan is one of five states where 17-year-olds are prosecuted in the adult criminal justice system, rather than the juvenile justice system. Following a trend in several other states, some Michigan stakeholders have begun a “raise the age” campaign to adjust the age of adult criminal liability to 18, the age of majority for all other purposes. The Legislature introduced bills to that effect last year, but opponents of the campaign warn that shifting 17-year-olds into the juvenile system will be an expensive burden on resource-strapped counties. Reformers counter that the move will ensure better outcomes for teens in the long run. Join us to hear expert panelists discuss the costs and benefits of raising the age.

Do Michigan Charter Schools Get More Bang for the Buck?

The past year’s rise of Betsy DeVos as U.S. Secretary of Education has brought more attention to the performance of charter schools, both nationally and in her native Michigan. Charter schools are tuition-free, state-funded schools of choice that tend to operate with fewer dollars than other public schools. How well are charter schools doing with the resources they have?