Results 121 to 130 of 243

Michigan's Experiment with Public School Choice: A First Year Assessment

In 1991, the state of Michigan required each of the state's 563 school districts to devise intra district choice plans by April 1992. Wittmann and DeVore examine those plans and conclude that what could have been a bold new beginning for school reform in Michigan turned out to be a largely unproductive extension of the status quo. Genuine choice, competition and accountability in education require far more fundamental changes that will break the monopoly of the public education establishment and create a real marketplace for education. 57 pages.

The Engler Administration: A Mid-Term Review

January 1993 marked the half-way point of Governor John Engler's first term. In this review of the Engler administration, the Mackinac Center notes, "While the nation opts for change in one direction, progress in another is taking place here under the leadership of Governor Engler toward putting government in its proper (read: smaller) place." The report cites the strengths and weaknesses of the administration and concludes by assigning Governor Engler an overall grade of "A-." In addition, several new initiatives are suggested for 1993 and 1994 including civil service reform, property tax cuts, budget reductions, and privatization. 8 pages.

Analysis of Tax Proposals on the 1992 Ballot

The November 1992 general election in Michigan included two propositions regarding property taxes, Proposals A and C. This evaluation presents a detailed analysis of them, including projections for state and local government revenues. Widely cited in the press when released, it remains a useful guide to Michigan's property tax structure. The report makes a strong case that Michigan, which has the second highest property tax burden among twelve Midwestern states, sorely needs a property tax cut to spur economic growth and to stem the exodus of business from the state. 44 pages.

Twenty Myths About National Health Insurance

The allure of national health insurance comes largely because it is perceived as successful in Canada and Britain. This thoroughly documented report shows conclusively that government-run national health insurance has led to serious and inevitable dilemmas that no country should want to emulate. The authors prove that other models have not been more successful than the U.S. in controlling costs or providing superior access to care, and that adoption of a national health system would have negative consequences. Released in cooperation with the Dallas-based National Center for Policy Analysis. 68 pages.

Responding to Municipal Fiscal Crisis: Bottom Line Lessons from Ecorse, Michigan

Ecorse, one of seventeen communities in the Downriver Detroit area, became the first Michigan city to be placed in receivership. Court-appointed Receiver Louis Schimmel turned the city's finances around through aggressive policies of cost cutting and privatization. He privatized the entire Department of Public Works for a minimum annual savings of $400,000. Other cities such as nearby Detroit have much to learn from the Ecorse experience. 13 pages.

New Hope for Michigan Welfare Reform

Welfare programs cost too much, foster dependency, and tear families apart. Consequently, they actually increase and perpetuate the very poverty which they are intended to remedy. What is required now is a sharp break from prevailing practices-a new philosophy of public assistance. This special report argues that Lansing lawmakers must restructure our state's welfare programs to provide incentives to keep families together and encourage people to work their way off welfare. The sixteen-point program for Michigan welfare reform, the first comprehensive proposal on the subject after the 1990 election, sparked a vigorous statewide debate. Dr. Gerald Miller, then director of the Michigan Department of Social Services, stated in June 1992, "Eleven of the Center's proposals were incorporated into Governor Engler's program." 7 pages.

Keeping the Engler Revolution on Track

This analysis of Governor Engler's first year in office gives the governor high marks for balancing the state's budget without a tax hike. The governor is urged not to shrink from the politics of constructive confrontation with legislative "big spenders." Includes a review of his first year in light of the Road Map for a Michigan Renaissance, issued by the Mackinac Center in November 1990, and makes recommendations for the continued downsizing of state government. 3 pages.

Educational Choice for Michigan

The sad state of public education in Michigan and America is largely due to its organization as a government-protected monopoly. The authors argue that injecting choice, competition and accountability into education would result in dramatic improvement. The report explodes the myths that the problem in education is too little money and that choice would lead to segregation or elitism. One chapter focuses on the remarkable achievements of 107 non-public schools in Detroit. 102 pages.

Progressive Environmentalism: A Pro-Human, Pro-Science, Pro-Free Enterprise Agenda for Change

Task Force Report

Radical environmentalism is the destructive notion that free enterprise is the danger and government is the manager of the environment. Conclusive facts, figures, and analysis show that private property and free markets should be encouraged if we want to clean up our environment. Specific changes in the law would improve environmental quality and preserve personal and economic liberties. 85 pages.

Employment-at-Will in Michigan: A Case for Retaining the Doctrine

The last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented assault on one of the last frontiers of free contract: the employment relationship. The ability of individuals to choose freely for whom they will work and who will work for them is being undermined by activist jurists and legislators and cheered on by statist academics. Skoppek traces this development in Michigan law, explains the breadth of harm it has caused, and argues strongly for change. 26 pages.