[Photo of James M. Hohman]

James M. Hohman

Assistant Director of Fiscal Policy

James M. Hohman is assistant director of fiscal policy at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy. He holds a degree in economics from Northwood University in Midland, Mich.

Union Rates Not Dropping Faster In RTW States

Right-to-work not to blame for fewer union members. … more

Right-to-Work States Have Lower Workplace Injury Rates

Rigged Pension Study Produces Expected Conclusions

Ideas For Fixing the Financial Manager Law

The Michigan 'Truth Squad' Problem With Facts

Fact-checking group gives in to partisan bent. … more

The Price Tag on the Ballot Proposals

Proposal 2 Would Declaw Emergency Managers in Proposal 1

Prop 3 Will Cost Michigan

Proposal 1 of 2012: The Referendum on Public Act 4

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy recently published “Proposal 1 of 2012: The Referendum on Public Act 4,” which addresses Proposal 1 on the Nov. 6, 2012 ballot, also referred to as the “emergency manager” referendum.
The study examines the claim that local control will diminish if Proposal 1 passes and Public Act 4 is nullified. Public Act 4 had provided expanded powers to state-appointed emergency managers of local governments and school districts that are in a state of serious “fiscal stress or “fiscal emergency.” The study determined that the question in Michigan has not been whether state-appointed managers or court-appointed receivers may replace local elected officials in running a local unit of government; they have been able to do so for decades. The only question is whether state government will participate in the effort to avoid local fiscal insolvency and how it will do so.
The Policy Brief was authored by James M. Hohman, assistant director of Fiscal Policy for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.  … more

Talent Mercantilists Resurrected in Michigan

Activist's Critique of Prop 3 Study Completely Incorrect

$1.6 Billion in Savings Lost Under Prop 2

What the Emergency Manager Referendum is About

Proposal 2 of 2012: An Assessment

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy recently published “Proposal 2 of 2012: An Assessment,” which addresses Proposal 2 on the Nov. 6, 2012 ballot, also referred to as the “collective bargaining” amendment.
The study examines how the proposed constitutional amendment would enshrine collective bargaining in the state constitution, which would allow government union collective bargaining agreements to invalidate numerous state laws meant to improve the quality of public services and would likely negate a projected $1.6 billion in annual taxpayer savings.
The Policy Brief was co-authored by Vernuccio and other Mackinac Center analysts: Senior Legal Analyst Patrick J. Wright, Executive Vice President Michael J. Reitz and Assistant Fiscal Policy Director James M. Hohman. Also co-authoring was Paul Kersey, director of labor policy at the Illinois Policy Institute. … more

Proposal 1 Has Nothing to Do With Local Control

Opponents should focus on fiscal responsibility. … more

$1.6 Billion in Savings Lost Under Prop 2

The financial impact of enshrined collective bargaining. … more

School Support Services Contracting Increases to 61 Percent of Districts

'Truth Squad' Gets Facts Wrong

The State Is Already Addressing 'Transition Costs' in School Pension Fund

Beware Doubling-Down on Municipal Pension Dysfunctions

Commentary: Pension Liabilities Larger Than Reported

Policymakers Still Tripped Up By Pension Transition Costs

"Transition costs" and "plunging credit ratings" are red herrings to pension reform.  … more

Study Finds That Teacher Pension Plan Unlikely to be Fully-Funded

The Legislature Must Fix Teacher Pensions the Right Way

Fix the Real Problem of the Pension System

Politicians to blame for unfunded liabilities. … more

MPSERS and MSERS: Three Pension Policy Briefs

Analysis: Agriculture Still Not the Second-Largest Industry in Michigan

House GOP Hides Behind Rigged 'Study'

Punting on pension reform keeps the burden on taxpayers. … more

Outsourcing Isn't the Problem

Special favors to bring jobs back not the answer. … more

Comparing Apples to Lemons in Pension Reform

Legislature needs to be transparent about costs. … more

House Pension Reform Savings are Phony

The Senate's plan is much more realistic. … more

Utah Incurred No Pension Reform ‘Transition Costs’

Michigan House Republicans should take note. … more

Michigan Already Diverges From GASB Rules

Full contributions in only two of last 10 years. … more

Teacher Pension Underfunding Hits $22B

Shows need to close fund immediately. … more

Michigan Pension Underfunding Gaps Widen

Another reason MPSERS should be closed now. … more

Analysis: Michigan’s Long History of Government Pension Problems

There Are Options to Address 'Transition Costs'

Plan would shift teachers to new pension system. … more

Commentary: Legislators Choose School Employees Over Taxpayers on Retirement Benefit Reform

Analysis: Local Governments Wrong to Call Foul On Property Tax Reform

The Public School Pension Fund’s Problem Is Not Charter Schools

Commentary: School Pension System Impacts Everyone’s Future

'Stranded Costs' Will Always Be Paid by Taxpayers

Keep charter school and contract employees out of MPSERS. … more

Commentary: Pension Reform Bigger School Fiscal Issue Than Education Budget

Close the State School Employee Pension Fund

Analysis: Two-Handed Michigan Recovery is Real

Pure Michigan’s Bid For More Tax Money

Five Options for Addressing ‘Transition Costs’ When Closing the MPSERS Pension Plan

Michigan Public School Employee Retirement Plans
in Need of Reform

This study considers the supposed ‘transition costs’ that would be effected by a state switch from a defined-benefit to defined-contribution retirement system. In it, the “transition costs” are found to be nonbinding and discretionary. In addition, the study offers the state a series of reforms that would diffuse such costs, as well as consideration for the long-term fiscal improvements that would arise from payment of the pension’s unfunded liabilities. … more