Paul Kersey is director of labor policy at the Illinois Policy Institute and served as director of labor policy at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy from September 2007 to May 2012.

Kersey holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. In 1993, he received his Juris Doctor from the University of Illinois.

After practicing law in Livonia, Mich., for several years, Kersey served on the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Government Reform and Oversight Committee. He then spent three years at the National Right to Work Committee as director of state legislation. In that role, he analyzed and responded to labor legislation in all 50 states.

Hide Your Kids! Hide Your Wife!

The truth about Flint crime and the jobs bill. … more

The Occupiers vs. Detroit's Recovery

The results might be different if people tried a different approach. … more

Initial 'Right-to-Teach' Bill Has Problems

Singling out the MEA may even let the union escape.  … more

Occam's Razor and Right-to-Work

EPI paper hides benefits of RTW with rationalizations. … more

Freedom to Teach

Ending forced union dues for teachers: a good idea that should be taken further. … more

Take Who Out?

Jimmy Hoffa's revealing choice of an enemy. … more

Lamons Law

NLRB ruling benefits unions and undermines workers' rights. … more

Unionized Government Gets Poor Reviews

Local officials believe government employee unions are more a liability than an asset. … more

CMU Strike: Standing Firm Is Not Bad Faith

Does PERA create unrealistic expectations? … more

How to Defuse PERA’s Ticking Time Bomb

They Can Be Taught!

The Legislature learns from its mistakes, heads off the union veto on tenure reform. … more

Grand Traverse County Commission Poised to Pass Freedom to Work Resolution

A Larger Perspective on Unions

Contrasting the oppression that unions face in Iran with the privileged position they have in the United States. … more

Time to Abolish Project Labor Agreements

Michigan Freedom to Work Kicks Off

A new civil rights campaign is launched in Michigan. … more

PLAs: Some Good News for Taxpayers

No more directing government construction work to union companies. … more

Just Shut It

The Obama administration moves to silence employers. … more

Introducing the New Labor Movement

"Union Conservatives" enter the fray. … more

Does the NLRB Really Expect Businesses to Ignore Strikes?

Are You Kinda Republican, Really Republican or Really, Really Republican?

The SEIU's in-depth survey. … more

'The Single Most Important Thing'

Stephen Moore on RTW in Michigan … more

And Now for Something Completely Different

Tennessee tries a new approach to teacher unions: “collaborative conferencing.” … more

A Little Graft Can Do A Lot of Damage

The real price tag of Carpenters union corruption. … more

Strike Back Harder

The Michigan Legislature can put an end to teacher strikes if it really wants to. … more

Careful There, Bob

Can the UAW benefit from Japan's problems? … more

A New Right-to-Work State?

New Hampshire could become the 23rd right-to-work state. … more

Poached Goose Eggs

Public policy has largely become an exercise in cleaning up the messes that the unions have made. … more

Massachusetts House Passes Labor Law Reform

A new bill would take health care off the bargaining table smorgasbord. … more

Acts of God

Don't like the emergency financial manager law? There's an alternative: Rein in government employee unions. … more

Another Way to Deal With Illegal Strikes

Illegal strikes represent the ultimate abuse, and the ultimate failure, of collective bargaining in government. The Legislature should not flinch from taking privileges away from unions that abuse them. … more

Union Corruption — The Latest from DOL

The latest news on the union corruption front. … more

On (Recent Events in) Wisconsin

It was always hard to imagine how this could end well for Wisconsin’s public-sector labor unions. … more

Bigger Fish to Fry

The frustration over the Civil Service Commission’s recent actions is entirely understandable and healthy. But the real opportunities for the state to save money are elsewhere. It’s a measure of the depth of Michigan’s spending problem that the CSC is far from the biggest challenge confronting lawmakers and taxpayers. … more

Government Unions Protest to Bankrupt Local Governments

Executive Budget Takes on Government Employee Compensation

With My Mind on My Money and My Money on My Mind

The Child Care Providers Together Michigan union, imposed on home-based child-care providers who run their own businesses from their homes, really accomplished little except to serve as a conduit through which state funds were redirected to a union. … more

Time to Repeal Public Act 312

At a time when governments are struggling to balance their budgets, it is essential that the public have maximum control over spending decisions. The choices that have to be made are not the sort that should be made by unaccountable arbitrators. The time has come for repeal of PA 312. … more

Public Union Reform Is Where the Money Is

Madness in Mad-Town

As unions in Wisconsin arrange sick-outs and their defenders in the Legislature flee the state, their reaction only buttresses the case for bringing an end to public-sector bargaining. After all, there is seldom much point in arguing with fanatics. Is bargaining with them likely to work any better? … more

This Should Be an Easy Call

At a time where difficult budgeting choices are being made all throughout the state, it would seem that opening up construction to all contractors, not just union shops, should be a pretty easy call to make. … more

The Latest in Union Crime in Michigan

There are a wide range of problems that stem from our unaccountable union culture, and radical union politics and job losses from unsustainable union demands may get the most attention. But plain old theft, sometimes petty, sometimes in the six-figure range, is a very real problem too. Union officials are not above temptation, and Michiganders would do well to keep that in mind. … more

Reconsidering Michigan's Public Employment Relations Act

Michigan’s Public Employment Relations Act requires local governments and school districts throughout Michigan to bargain collectively with unions representing their employees. The collective bargaining process is a creation of the state Legislature, which also has the power to repeal or amend it.

No area of public policy in Michigan is more in need of fresh thinking than the relationship between government and its employees. With Michigan’s recurring government budget struggles, and with a new Legislature and governor espousing a commitment to performance, efficiency and accountability in government, a new labor law for government employees is imperative.

This report outlines a variety of ways the Michigan Legislature can address the damaging impact of PERA. … more

A Reform Movement Is Born

Legislative interest in reining in government unions is a welcome development, but it will be up to the voters of Ohio, Wisconsin and Michigan to make sure their elected officials follow through. … more

The Case for Item Pricing Repeal

A friend of mine who works at a Kroger in metro Detroit passed along his thoughts on the "Item Pricing" law, and I figure they're worth sharing: … more

The Bottom Falls Out

During 2010, unions lost 83,000 members in Michigan, a decline in membership of 11.7 percent. … more

Ballot Bluff

Secret-ballot votes aren't an "acceptable" method for workers to determine whether or not to unionize — they're a clearly superior method. The higher the stakes, the dirtier the campaign, the more valuable the secret ballot becomes. The UAW should simply accept that and move on. … more

March Madness?

Gov. Snyder in his State of the State speech gave us no idea what his goal is for employee benefits or how to reach it. If there's one thing a manager should know, it's that if you fail to set a target you're guaranteed not to hit it. Let's hope he sets it in March. Preferably early March. … more