Issues & Ideas Luncheon, May 2005

Listen to Expert Speakers Over Lunch

The Mackinac Center for Public Policy is pleased to host monthly Issues & Ideas Luncheons in Lansing. These luncheons, which feature experts on a diverse array of subjects, offer a forum that enhances and broadens the policy debate to include theoretical and philosophical ideals—and suggestions for achieving them.

News media, legislators, policy staff and interested citizens are cordially invited to the

MAY ISSUES & IDEAS LUNCHEON

“Paving the Road to Michigan’s Recovery”

Dick Armey
U.S. House Majority Leader, 104th Congress
Principal Author of the Contract With America
Chairman of FreedomWorks

DATE:

Tuesday, May 24, 2005

TIME:

12:00 - 2:00 p.m.

LOCATION:

The Radisson Hotel Lansing, Capitol I Room
111 North Grand Avenue
Lansing, MI 48933

COST:

Lunch is provided at no charge,
with reservation.

Despite four years of economic growth nationally, Michigan remains mired in an economic crisis. The state’s unemployment rate of 6.9 percent is now second worst in the nation, while employment growth has trailed every other state during the past decade. Per-capita gross state product also has lagged. Obviously, a change of course is needed.

High taxes are a significant problem, but so, too, are the state’s regulatory policies. In particular, Michigan’s unpredictable, costly and excessively bureaucratic regulation of telecommunications has inhibited the high-tech investment and innovation the state desperately needs to prosper. Dick Armey, a former U.S. House Majority Leader and a respected policy entrepreneur will discuss the challenges facing Michigan and recommend effective strategies to reverse the state’s misfortunes.

The luncheon begins promptly at noon. Please make reservations for yourself or your guests by 5 p.m. on Monday, May 16 by calling the Mackinac Center at (989) 631‑0900.

The Purpose of the Issues & Ideas Luncheon

The nature of the legislative process is such that public policy debates are often framed by specific constituencies and political pragmatism rather than by sound principles. By offering a forum for wide-ranging discussion, the Mackinac Center for Public Policy hopes to broaden the debate to include theoretical and philosophical ideals — and how to achieve them. The best interests of Michigan citizens can be served only when legislation incorporates our best understanding of legal, economic, psychological, moral and scientific principles.

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