The new Dearborn school district superintendent Glenn Maleyko says he is worried about losing his best teachers.

Maleyko told the Dearborn Press and Guide there will be a teacher shortage, and the newspaper claims the teacher pay scale is lower than what many professionals earn with a bachelor’s degree.

But the U.S. Census data doesn’t back that claim up.

The median salary for a person with a bachelor’s degree is $50,450, according to the American Community Survey 2014 put out by the U.S. Census.

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree in the Dearborn school district and nine years of experience would earn $52,163. The average salary of a Dearborn schoolteacher was $62,266 in 2013-14; according to the Michigan Department of Education. (The average includes many teachers who get paid more because they have more than bachelor's degrees.)

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University of Michigan economist Don Grimes said that American Community Survey includes all workers, including part-time workers.

“If you had full-time equivalent wages it would raise everyone's wage a bit, but would not change the story in a fundamental way,” Grimes said. “But, I think your basic question is, are wages for college grads really that low? And the answer to that is yes. One-half of the people with a bachelor's degree (but not a graduate or professional degree) earn less than $50,450 and one-half earn more in the U.S.”

“But it’s even worse in Ingham (median for a bachelor’s degree is $40,225) and Isabella (median for a bachelor’s degree is $41,027),” Grimes said. “There are a lot of people out there in the world making a relatively small salary, even relatively well educated people.”

In Ingham County, a teacher with a bachelor’s with four years of experience in the Lansing school district would earn $43,386 a year. In Isabella County, a Mt. Pleasant school district teacher with a bachelor’s and six years experience would earn $41,693 a year.

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See also:

Teachers on Food Stamps? Not Likely

Myths and Exaggerations About Teacher Pay

The Myth of Teacher Poverty


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