October 24, 2014, MichiganVotes Weekly Report

Extend film subsidies, and more key votes from 2014

While the Legislature is on a campaign season break from voting, the Roll Call Report continues a series reviewing key votes of the 2013-2014 session, starting with one that occurred this week.

Senate Bill 1103, Extend film producer subsidies: Passed 32 to 4 in the Senate on October 22

To eliminate a 2017 sunset on the law authorizing state subsidies for film productions, and make various changes to the formula used to calculate a particular producer's subsidy. This would remove limitations on giving larger subsidies based on very high compensation paid to well-known actors and directors, which could allow particular productions to claim a larger share of the total subsidy budget. Legislators earlier authorized distributing $50 million in state tax revenue to film producers through in the current fiscal year.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Stay Engaged

Receive our weekly emails!

Senate Bill 853, Ban automated eyeglass "kiosks": Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on March 27

To prohibit automated testing devices that provide eye exams and issue prescriptions for glasses or contact lenses. Instead, only state-licensed optometrists and physicians could write lens prescriptions. This would pre-empt eyeglass kiosks in drugstores and other retail locations, which are reportedly a lower cost alternative to conventional optometry services and are available in some states.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 991, Let terminal patients try non-FDA approved treatments: Passed 31 to 2 in the Senate on August 13

To establish that a person diagnosed with a terminal illness has a “right to try” experimental drugs or therapies not approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration, subject to various conditions specified in the bill. Health care providers and drug makers who comply with these conditions would be immune from liability if the patient is harmed. The bill responds to criticism that FDA “safe and effective” standards are not appropriate in these cases.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Initiated Legislation 2, Preempt referendum banning wolf hunt: Passed 23 to 10 in the Senate

To preempt the effect of a referendum placed on the November ballot by interests opposed to wolf hunting. This measure (IL 2) was sponsored by groups in favor of a wolf hunt. Through a complex interaction of court rulings, statute revisions and the constitutionally authorized Initiated Legislation process, adoption of this measure by the Senate and House (below) means the anti-wolf hunt proposals on the 2014 ballot will not go into effect even if a majority of voters approve it.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 758, Authorize more stringent sanctions for delinquent hotel tax: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on March 26

To empower counties that choose to impose a tax of up to 5 percent on hotel and motel room charges to enforce the tax with more stringent sanctions that potentially include forfeiture and foreclosure.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5233, Expand scope of criminal property seizure law: Passed 37 to 1 in the Senate on October 2

To expand the state's criminal forfeiture law by making the property of an owner deemed "willfully blind" to illegal activity taking place on the premises subject to forfeiture. The bill would also allow the seizure of property transferred to a new owner after the crime in some cases, and authorize forfeiture for more crimes. This law allows the government to seize property used in a crime or acquired with its proceeds, with the money from its sale turned over to the agencies that effected the forfeiture.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5785, Expand permissible criminal court cost levies: Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on October 2

To expand the costs that can be imposed on an individual convicted in a criminal case. This would authorize imposing assessments covering a share of court employee salaries and benefits, court building “operation and maintenance" costs and more. A court would have no duty to show how it allocated these costs to a particular defendant. The bill reverses a state Supreme Court case that limited charges to those specifically allowed in a particular statute.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 853, Ban automated eyeglass "kiosks": Passed 108 to 2 in the House on June 11

The House vote on the bill described above. This was signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder on June 26.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 991, Let terminal patients try non-FDA approved treatments: Passed 109 to 0 in the House on October 2

The House vote on the bill described above. This was signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder on Oct. 15.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Initiated Legislation 2, Preempt referendum banning wolf hunt: Passed 65 to 43 in the House on August 27

The House vote on the measure described above. The measure went into effect with this vote because Initiated Legislation does not require the Governor's signature.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

Senate Bill 758, Authorize more stringent sanctions for delinquent hotel tax: Passed 97 to 13 in the House on September 9

The House vote on the bill described above. This was signed into law by Gov. Snyder on Sept. 23.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5233, Expand scope of criminal property seizure law: Passed 93 to 13 in the House on September 16

The House vote on the bill described above. This was signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder on Oct. 15.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

House Bill 5785, Expand permissible criminal court cost levies: Passed 95 to 14 in the House on September 18

The House vote on the bill described above. This was signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder on Oct. 15.

Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

SOURCE: MichiganVotes.org, a free, non-partisan website created by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, providing concise, non-partisan, plain-English descriptions of every bill and vote in the Michigan House and Senate. Please visit http://www.MichiganVotes.org.

 


Related Articles:

Michigan Was Right to End Film Incentives

Power to the People: 2015 Brought Some Key Reforms to Michigan

Why Government Fails at Economic Development

Rep. Sam Singh Says He Opposes Corporate Giveaways; His Voting Record Says Otherwise

How a Private Arts Festival Thrives

Jobs Department’s Fake News: $10 Tax return for Every $1 in Subsidies