Every week, MichiganVotes.org sends a report to newspapers and TV stations showing how just the state legislators in each publication's service area voted on the most important and interesting bills and amendments of the past seven days. The version shown here instead contains a link to the complete roll call tally in either the House or Senate. To find out who your state senator is and how to contact him or her go here; for state representatives go here.

Stay Engaged

Receive our weekly emails!

 

House Bill 4556, Revise parking enforcement volunteer training, passed in the Senate (38 to 0)
To require eight hours of parking enforcement training required for volunteers authorized under a 2007 law to write parking tickets. Under current law 40 hours are required.

Complete Roll Call Vote Tally

House Joint Resolution LLL (Ban DRIC eminent domain and limit toll authority)
Introduced by Rep. David Agema (R), to prohibit a government authority, or quasi-public public-private partnership created to build a bridge (including the Detroit International Bridge Crossing project) or toll road from levying user fees or tolls unless the legislature explicitly grants specific statutory authority, or from having the power of condemnation and eminent domain property taking regardless of legislative action. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.

House Joint Resolution MMM (Call constitutional convention for balanced budget and commerce clause limits)
Introduced by Rep. Paul Opsommer (R), to place before voters in the next general election a Constitutional amendment to petition Congress to call a constitutional convention to propose amendments to require a balanced federal budget and to limit the federal government's power under the commerce clause.

Senate Joint Resolution X (Lengthen legislative term limits)
Introduced by Sen. Gilda Jacobs (D), to place before voters in the next general election a Constitutional amendment to extend the term limits of state representatives and senators, allowing the former up to six terms of two-years each, and the latter up to three terms of four years each. Currently, representatives may only have three two-year terms, and senators two four-year terms. Term limits on legislators and state officers were adopted by a 59-41 percent vote of the people in 1992. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.

Senate Joint Resolution Y (Require legislative approval of state/federal agreements, compacts, etc.)
Introduced by Sen. Michelle McManus (R), to authorize a legislative commission to review the constitutionality of federal actions that require state actions. Among other things the commission would be required to monitor and examine all "memoranda of understanding" or agreement, compacts, or similar binding agreements between this state and the federal government, other states, or nongovernmental organizations. These could not go into law unless the commission approved, or unless it took no action within 90 days. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.

Senate Joint Resolutions Z and AA (Place slant drilling ban in constitution)
Introduced by Sen. Roger Kahn (R), Sen. Patricia Birkholz (R) and Sen. Glenn Anderson (D), to place before voters in the next general election a Constitutional amendment to ban "slant drilling" for oil or gas under the Great Lakes. Slant drilling, in which a well is drilled from an inland location and then "slanted" to tap into oil located 3,000 to 4,000 feet below the lake, is already banned by a 2001 statute. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.

Senate Joint Resolution W (Impose state spending cap [TABOR] )
Introduced by Sen. Bruce Patterson (R), to place before voters in the next general election a Constitutional amendment that would limit changes in state spending to changes in the inflation rate and changes in population ("Taxpayer Bill of Rights"). Any revenue that exceeds this would be returned to taxpayers in a manner to be determined by the legislature. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.

Share