A one-page PDF of these charts is available here.

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Measured by the Bureau of Labor Statistics establishment survey, this measures the number of payroll jobs in the economy, excluding farm jobs. Since 2000, RTW states added 6 percent more jobs.
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Measured by the Bureau of Labor Statistics establishment survey, this measures the number of payroll jobs in the economy, excluding farm jobs. RTW states held an advantage in nearly every year while non-RTW states and Michigan sank. Recently, they’ve been growing at roughly the same rates.
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Gross Domestic Product is the value of the goods and services produced in an economy, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. These figures are adjusted to inflation. Except for 2008, RTW states outperformed non-RTW states every year since 2003.
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Gross Domestic Product is the value of the goods and services produced in an economy, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. These figures are adjusted to inflation. Over time, RTW states outperform non-RTW states while Michigan lost GDP.
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The new 2010 Census figures show that RTW states grew their populations substantially more than non-RTW states. Michigan was the only state of any kind whose population fell.
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Images from “Right-to-Work Dashboard”
Images from “Right-to-Work Dashboard”

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