The Washington Post reported this week that in the face of hesitation and outright resistance from governors and legislatures, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is "working on a new partnership model to let state agencies help run the exchange — perhaps without the need for legislative authorization."

The department says just 11 states have "embraced" the exchange idea, which is a core component of Obamacare. Under the law, if a state does not create a state exchange that complies with an extensive array of federal regulations, then the federal government will create its own exchange in the state. Health care experts critical of Obamacare say there will be little or no difference between state-created exchanges compared to a federal one, except that state-level taxpayers will have to pay the costs of the former.

In Michigan, Gov. Rick Snyder has not yet decided whether to create a state Obamacare exchange, according to a state Department of Community Health spokesperson. The department has already performed the groundwork to create one, however, after accepting a $1 million Obamacare grant for the purpose. It convened a series of "work groups" comprised of individuals representing various special interests. Among other things, the process resulted in draft legislation that would authorize a state exchange.

See also: Michigan Creeps Closer to Obamacare 'Exchange'